Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
  Contents
  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  Glacier National Park
 
 

BACK - NEXT

 

Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

TOP

       
  Order Podicipediformes - Grebes
   Family Podicipedidae - Grebes
  Grebes are small to medium-sized divers found in all temperate and tropical regions of the world, mainly in fresh water. Their legs are set far back on the body making walking on land difficult. They are foot-propelled divers - their toes are lobed, not webbed and they can adjust their buoyancy to swim with only the head above water. Their plumage is thick and waterproof. Their tail is vestigial. They are weak fliers but perform extensive migrations. Shorter-billed species feed on a variety of aquatic organisms. Longer-billed species include fish in their diet. Their calls are loud and characterize our fresh-water habitats.
     
MORE
     
  Western Grebe, Aechmophorus occidentalis
 
    Cornell     USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        WINTER - Accidental
            BEACH, BAYS (salt-brackish water)
 
 
   The Western Grebe is large (larger than the Red-necked Grebe) and slender with a long neck and a thin bill. It is "pied" - dark above, white below. There is an indistinct wing stripe that might be seen in flight. The iris is red and is placed in a dark field. This species has a spectacular mutual courtship display...  They may utter a two-part "dreed-dreet" year round. As its name implies, this is a western species, breeding in the plains and mountains west of the Great Lakes, ranging to the Pacific Coast.    
 
       
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Cape Romain: accidental. Huntington Beach - exceptional, January.
   P&G: Casual, 3 coastal records (June, April, November).
   M&P:
Record from Bull Island retracted.
   Avendex:
4 coastal records (add March sighting).
   Potter: Rare accidental on the coast in winter.
  ●   Look for it in sheltered marine and brackish waters including bays, inlets, channels, and lagoons - it is less likely on inland reservoirs and lakes than other grebes. Accidental on Seabrook (note that it has not been recorded on coastal Christmas Bird Counts).
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
NEXT
 

KEY:    ■ Seabrook list     □ Kiawah list