Birds of Seabrook Island

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  Spoonbill
 
 

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  Order Ciconiiformes (Pelecaniformes) - Wading Birds
   Family Threskiornithidae - Ibises and Spoonbills
      Subfamily Plataleinae - Spoonbills
  Wading Birds are medium to large, long-legged and long necked. Their bills are long, straight, and sharp. Most species are dependent on water for feeding. Most nest in colonies - a few are solitary. Young remain in the nest after hatching and are cared for by both parents.
   The Tree of Life places herons and bitterns in the Pelecaniformes.
Spoonbills filter water and mud for their food - they sweep their head from side-to-side and close their spatulate bill on contacted food items.  
     
MORE (Order)      MORE (Family)
     
  Roseate Spoonbill, Platalea ajaja 
 
Cornell     USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        SUMMER, FALL - Rare / Accidental - Increasing in our area
           MARSHES, WET-LANDS (fresh water)
MORE PICTURES
 
   Roseate Spoonbills are unmistakable. They are larger than our ibises and adults wear a delicate pink coat over their body with brighter pink in the wing coverts. Young are a lighter pink. They would be found in marshes, swamps, ponds, the margins of rivers, and lagoons. Nearest breeders are probably in central Florida.  
Roseate Spoonbill
 
Roseate Spoonbill. Huntington Beach State Park. Photo by Ed Konrad
   
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Kiawah - rare spring through fall.
      Coastal - rare summer visitor. Hilton Head - rare summer visitor. Cape Romain - accidental.
         Huntington Beach - exceptional April, August, October.
      Caw Caw - rare fall. ACE - accidental.
   P&G: Very rare coastal visitor. 16 records, most in summer. 17 March - 14 October.
   M&P: Now over 29 reports, paralleling recovery of populations in Florida. 11 sightings since 1986.
   Avendex: 32 records. Maximum - 19 birds, Savannah Spoil Area, September 12 - November 21, 2004. Records in all months from March-December, peaking in October. Found along SC coast north to Huntington Beach.
  Avendex
     Potter: Very rare visitors in the Carolinas. Most likely near the coast during mid-May to October (post-breeding dispersal).
  ●  Not expected on Seabrook but increasing in recent years - accidental. Note that Potter and other SC sources indicate summer - fall occurrences. Avendex now suggests that most likely sightings are in the fall (October). Note the absence of sightings on the Christmas Bird Counts.
   If Spoonbills occur on Seabrook, I'd look for them in the Duneloft salt marsh, an area herons and ibises periodically find quite productive. Two have recently been observed near Mingo Point along the Kiawah River... A visitor in 2014 was found in the adjacent marsh between Marsh Haven and Deer Point. David Gardner reports flying spoonbills in the Camp St. Christopher area.
       
    Banner - Spoonbill - Discovery Island, Disney World, FL
 
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