Birds of Seabrook Island

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  Tundra Swan
 
 

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  Order Anseriformes - Waterfowl
   Family Anatidae - Ducks, Geese, and Swans
      Subfamily Anserinae - Geese and Swans
  Waterfowl vary in size - from teal to swans. They all have webbed feet and dense, waterproof plumage. Most nest on the ground and the nest is lined with down plucked by the female from her breast. Except for two small groups not found in North America, all belong to one (or two) families.
Ducks, Geese, and Swans are waterfowl with their bill finely serrated or grooved on the edge. Their tongue is fleshy. Their front toes are webbed. Males have a functional penis. They are strong fliers and many migrate long distances. 
Geese and Swans are larger waterfowl. In geese, the neck is shorter than the body and in swans, the neck is long.   . 
 
Bear Island Wildlife Management Area
Donnelley Wildlife Management Area
 
     
  Tundra (Whistling) Swan, Cygnus columbianus 
 
  Cornell     USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        WINTER - Rare / Rare  
           IMPOUNDMENTS. BAYS
MORE PICTURES
 
   Tundra Swans are large white birds. In most birds, there is a patch of yellow at the lateral base of the dark bill that extends toward the eye. It breeds on the tundra on open ponds and lakes, often near the coast, and is found on marshes, ponds, and bays in winter with large numbers classically wintering on the Chesapeake Bay  
Tundra Swan
     
Tundra Swans. Bear Island WMA
Photo by Ed Konrad
   
  RANGE: Arctic tundra from Baffin Island, west on the lower islands and coast of the Arctic Ocean to northern and western Alaska. Winters along both coasts within the United States. The species is Holarctic in distribution.
   On the East Coast, many winter in the Chesapeake Bay area and migrate from there through the Great Lakes to their breeding grounds in the high Arctic. They were regular visitors to the North Cape area of Lake Erie where I was introduced to them as a teen ager by the late Harold Mayfield.
  BREEDING: Monogamous, one brood. Nests on an elevated hummock. The male selects the site and both parents construct a nest, 1-2 feet in diameter, using grass and moss. It is usually placed on an elevated site and may be reused in subsequent years. The female lays 4-5 (up to 7) eggs which are incubated for 31-32 (35-40)? days. The female provides the majority of the incubation time. Precocial young are led to feeding sites and adults may rarely feed them directly. They fledge in 2-3 months but remain with their parents through the first winter.
  DIET: Largely aquatic vegetation - seeds, stems, roots, etc., and a few small invertebrates. In winter, they often feed on harvested fields (corn, barley, soybeans). They forage by dabbling, dipping their head underwater or tipping. They sometimes feed on moonlit nights.
  VOICE: Their voice is a lilting, clear, singing "kloo" with a hooting quality. A resting flock utters a musical muttering.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Coastal - uncommon winter visitor. Hilton Head - rare winter visitor.
         Huntington Beach
- rare November, uncommon December-January, rare February
      Caw Caw - uncommon, winter. ACE- accidental
   CBC: ACE 212, 165, 325, 195, 500, 83, 196, 42; Charleston 0, 2, 4, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0;
            McClellanville 0, 0, 1, 0, nc, 0, 9, 0; Winyah Bay x, x, 0, 0, 0, CW, 0, 2; Litchfield/Pawley's 20, 0, 0, 0, 0, 2, 0, 0.
   P&G: Rare winter visitor on coastal plain. Occurs regularly at Huntington Beach, South Island, Bull's Island, Doe Hall Plantation (McClellanville), and Savannah NWR. Dates: 2 October - 22 April.
   M&P: Numbers have increased since 1970.
   Avendex: 16 records. Maximum 2,000, Bear Island WMA, February 19, 2000. Absent June-October.
   Potter: Large winter flocks occur around wildlife refuges in North Carolina.
 

●   In South Carolina, swans may be seen in winter at Huntington Beach State Park, the Bear Island Wildlife Management Area, and other management areas including the Santee NWR. They are listed as uncommon at Caw Caw. I wouldn't expect then on Seabrook although the lake at Freshfields and possibly some of our lagoons might be visited by a small group.
   Consider them to be very unlikely on Seabrook. Rare..

       
    Banner - Tundray Swans, Bear Island WMA
       
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