Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Ring-necked Duck
 
 

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  Order Anseriformes - Waterfowl
   Family Anatidae - Ducks, Geese, and Swans
      Subfamily Anatinae - True Ducks
         Tribe Aythyini - Bay Ducks (Pochards)
  Waterfowl vary in size - from teal to swans. They all have webbed feet and dense, waterproof plumage. Most nest on the ground and the nest is lined with down plucked by the female from her breast. Except for two small groups not found in North America, all belong to one (or two) families.
Ducks, Geese, and Swans are waterfowl with their bill finely serrated or grooved on the edge. Their tongue is fleshy. Their front toes are webbed. Males have a functional penis. They are strong fliers and many migrate long distances. 
True Ducks are sexually dimorphic. The female incubates and cares for the young - the male usually deserts early. Ducks undergo a simultaneous molt of their flight feathers and are flightless until the flight feathers of the alternate plumage regrow. Thus, males wear their nuptial plumage on the winter grounds where pair formation occurs in most species. 
Bay Ducks are heavy-bodied diving ducks that use their feet while underwater.   
 
Bear Island Wildlife Management Area
Donnelley Wildlife Management Area
 
     
  Ring-necked Duck, Aythya collaris
 
 Cornell     USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        WINTER - Uncommon / Rare
            LAKES, IMPOUNDMENTS (fresh-water)
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   Ring-necked Ducks are small ducks with a tall crown on their head. In males, the bill is outlined in white and the head, neck and belly are iridescent blue. There is a white "spur" on the side, separating the front of the body from the flanks. The wings are dark. Females have a dark cap with a white ring around their eye and a faint spur on the side.
Ring-necked Duck
     
Ring-necked Ducks. Female (left) and male (right).Boulder, CO. Photo by Ed Konrad
   
  RANGE: Ring-necks breed from Newfoundland across southern Canada and around the Great Lakes northwest to central Alaska and south along the Pacific ranges to eastern Oregon. They winter along both coasts across the southern states and Mexico south to the West Indies and Panama.
  BREEDING: Monogamous. One brood. The female nests on relatively dry sites near water, on a hummock of in bushes at the water's edge or over shallow water. The nest- site is a slight depression. The female begins building a nest using fine grass, moss and nearby material and lining it with down. She lays 8-14 eggs. Incubation lasts 21-27 days. The male remains through most of incubation and feed with her when she leaves the nets. Development is precocial. The young leave the nest after hatching and go to water. They are tended by the female. Broods may join under the care of several adult females. Young can fly at 47-56 days of age.
  DIET: Diet varies with season and habitat but animal matter may predominate, especially mollusks, aquatic insects, and crustaceans. They also eat stems, leaves and seeds of aquatic vegetation. The young eat mainly invertebrates for the first 2-3 weeks. In the Great Lakes Zebra mussels may male up much of the diet. They forage by diving and swimming underwater - sometimes by dabbling and upending. They may feed at night.
  VOICE: The female gives a purring or rough growl "kerp kerp..." The male is usually silent.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Kiawah - rare, fall and spring; occasional winter.
      Coastal - fairly common winter resident. Hilton Head - fairly common winter visitor. Cape Romain - common/absent/common/common.          Huntington Beach - uncommon, October; common, November - March; uncommon April.
      Caw Caw - uncommon/absent/uncommon/fairly common. ACE - occasional/absent/occasional /uncommon.
   CBC: ACE 0, 20, 58, 722, 158, 380, 109, 3127; Charleston 1018, 305, 366, 79, 12, 78, 22, 83;
            St. Helena/Fripp x, x, x, x, x, x, 1, 6; Hilton Head 2, 4, 2, 1, 3, 4, 27, 11; Sun City/Okatie 0, 7, 2, 0, 0, 1, 0, 0;
            McClellanville99, 2682, 220, 54, nc, 614, 3350, 34; Winyah Bay x, x, 17, 45, 0, 10, 6, 295; Litchfield/Pawley's 27, 12, 3, 15, 20, 15, 35, 101.
   P&G: Very common winter visitor. Maximum 1,400 Bennettesville, 7 February 1986. Dates 21 October - 27 May.
   M&P: High count, Par Pond, SRP, 20 November 1988 (3056). Only one coastal report since 1986.
   Avendex: 3 reports. 3,000 Georgetown, March, 21 1997.
   Potter: Common winter resident, late October to April - fresh-water lakes and impoundments.
  ●  Rare. Look for these ducks in our lakes during migration and in winter... They are regular at Huntington Beach State Park, Caw Caw, Donnelley WMA, and other nearby refuges, Middleton Place, etc.
       
    Banner - Ring-necked Ducks, Middleton Place.
       
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