Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
  Contents
  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  Yellow Rail
 
 

BACK - NEXT

 

Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

TOP

       
  Order Gruiformes - Crakes, Rails and Allies
   Family Rallidae - Rails, Gallinules, Coots

  Gruiforms include a diverse assemblage found in most areas of the world. They are aquatic or terrestrial with the anterior toes free or incompletely webbed.
Rails are primarily water birds with a compressed body, long toes, and short, rounded wings. They are secretive and are best located by their song. Many feed at night, foraging while walking in damp marshes or swimming in shallow water.
Small Rails - Crakes.
These are small, very secretive rails that are seldom seen. They have short bills.
     
     
  Yellow Rail, Coturnicops noveboracensis
 
       Cornell     USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        WINTER - Very rare / Occasional
            CORDGRASS MARSH, MEADOWS, RICE FIELDS
 
   The Yellow Rail is small, short-tailed, and has a short bill. The back is striped and the secondaries are white. The Yellow Rail is a secretive species and individuals are difficult to flush. They are generally quiet on their wintering grounds where they are usually found in drier fresh-water and brackish marshes, especially areas with dense stands of cordgrass. They also occur on wet meadows, marsh edges, and rice fields near the coast. When they do sing, their voice is a mechanical clicking sound like that of the Cricket Frog or two stones being tapped together. It is given at night.
 
       
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Kiawah - rare fall through spring.
      Coastal - rare winter visitor. Hilton Head - rare winter visitor. Cape Romain - rare winter. Huntington Beach - exceptional July, March.
      ACE - rare fall and winter.
   CBC: Winyah Bay x, x, 0, 1, 0, 0, 0, 0.
   P&G: Very rare winter visitor. Dates 15 October - 21 March. No reliable reports published since 1949.
   M&P: No Yellow Rails have been seen in South Carolina since 1933. Individuals answered playbacks in several Carolina bays in eastern Richland Co. in 1987, 1989, and 1991. Another responded to rock-clicking in Santee NWR in 1991 and 1992. One called in a marsh at the edge of Lake Marion in 1988 and one was heard in Santee NWR in 1989.
   Avendex: 9 records, late December - April. Maximum: 3 Samworth WMA, December 2000.
   Potter: A fall and spring migrant and it winters along the coast to an undetermined extent. Records place this small, secretive bird in marsh edges, wet meadows, and grain fields from late September to mid-April. Because it is seldom flushed and is generally silent in winter, its distribution may never be fully understood.
  ●  Yellow Rails are flushed by fire and it is possible that netting in appropriate habitat would find them. Coastal records include Huntington Beach State Park, Magnolia Gardens, McClellanville, Santee Coastal Reserve, South Island, and Samworth WMA. This is a really difficult species to find and we probably lack suitable habitat. They would be accidental on Seabrook. The Jenkins Point marsh (banner) is probably the only place to find them.
   
   
   
   
   
 

       
NEXT
 

KEY:    ■ Seabrook list     □ Kiawah list