Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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  Red Phalarope
 
 

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  Order Charadriiformes - Plovers, Sandpipers, Gulls, Terns, Auks
   Family Stercorariidae - Skuas and Jaegers

  Charadriiforms are a diverse group of shore and aquatic or wading or terrestrial birds. They include the sandgrouse, shore birds, gulls and terns, and alcids. The majority breed in the Northern Hemisphere.
   The Tree of Life includes shorebirds with the Ciconiiformes.
Sandpipers are a diverse group of shorebirds with bills not swollen at the tip. Most live in association with water. Short-billed forms feed on the surface using vision. Long-billed forms probe in mud and their prey is located by touch or smell. Tides influence their feeding cycles.   
Phalaropes are small swimming Charadrii with compressed tarsi and the toes are lobed or scalloped. The plumage on their under-parts is dense and provides buoyancy. They feed on the water, spinning like tops to stir up larvae, crustaceans, and insects in the resulting vortex. They feed by picking food from the surface of the water. Phalaropes are active birds.
   Females are larger and brighter than males and the sexes reverse their normal roles; females establish territory and court, males incubate eggs and care for the chicks. They are polyandrous and the females may have multiple mates (compare them to the Spotted Sandpiper). All phalaropes tend to be pelagic and Red and Red-necked Phalarope spend most of their life at sea.
     
     
  Red Phalarope, Phalaropus fulicarius
 
  USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        MIGRATION - Pelagic - very rare offshore
            PELAGIC
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   Red Phalaropes breed on the Arctic islands and shores of the Arctic Ocean on wet coastal tundra in both the New and Old Worlds. Non-breeding adults look much lie Red-necked Phalaropes but have a thicker bill and a pale gray back. (The non-breeding Red-necked Phalarope has a streaked gray back.) In winter, the Red Phalarope is mainly pelagic. It is always rare inland.   
Red Phalarope
     
Red Phalarope, adult - nonbreeding.
Monterey Bay Aquarium
   
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Coastal - fairly common transient, pelagic. Hilton Head - accidental migrant. Cape Romain - accidental. Huntington Beach - exceptional March.
   P&G: Uncommon offshore migrant, common winter visitor. Accidental inland. Maximum 840 off Charleston, Dates: 2 March 1985 . 15 September - 30 May.
   Avendex: 21 records, ,spring and fall.
   Potter: Large numbers pass our coast well offshore (mid-March to mid-May and mid-August to early December. Storm-blown birds may be found on our beaches. This species probably remains off our coast all winter.
  ●  Accidental.
 



  Banner - Red Phalarope, Monterey Bay Aquarium.
       
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