Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Long-tailed Jaeger
 
 

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  Order Charadriiformes - Plovers, Sandpipers, Gulls, Terns, Auks
   Family Stercorariidae - Skuas and Jaegers

  Charadriiforms are a diverse group of shore and aquatic or wading or terrestrial birds. They include the sandgrouse, shore birds, gulls and terns, and alcids. The majority breed in the Northern Hemisphere.
   The Tree of Life includes shorebirds with the Ciconiiformes.
Skuas and Jaegers are pelagic birds outside the breeding season and are largely predators of small mammals, birds, their eggs and chicks, and even adults. Many augment their food supply by kleptoparasitism (stealing someone else's food). They have a cere and the upper mandible has more than one scale (compound rhamphotheca). They have claws that are hooked. The bill is gull-like with a hooked tip. Larger (and European) representatives of this subfamily are called "skuas." Three smaller North American skuas are called "jaegers" and adults have long central tail feathers. There are different common names for the same species depending on where you are... Don't expect representatives on Seabrook.
     
     
  Long-tailed Jaeger, Sterocarius longicaudus
 
   USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoLL
        MIGRATION - Very rare / Accidental
            PELAGIC
 
 
   The adult breeding Long-tailed Jaeger has a neat black cap, a pale back with dark wings. The breast is white and the cheeks have a pale wash. The bill is short and stout. Adults have long, flowing central tail feathers in the breeding season; in juveniles the central tail feathers are blunt-tipped but also project well beyond the other tail feathers. It is particularly difficult to identify immature birds. They breed on open or alpine tundra and flats with little vegetation across Europe, Asia, and North America. They are casual on inland waters in winter. 
 
     
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Coastal - very rare (local) transient. Cape Romain - accidental. Huntington Beach - exceptional -  November, March.
   P&G: 2 sight records by Wayne in 1896 - questioned. Third seen off Pawley's Island, 13 July 1958.
   Avendex: 9 reports, scattered.
   Potter: Present in Carolina waters from mid-April to mid-December, it is most frequently seen from mid-May to mid-June and mid-September to mid-October. Onshore sightings occur mostly in May.
  ●  Accidental.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
 


       
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