Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
  Contents
  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  Common Gull
 
 

BACK - NEXT

 

Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

TOP

       
  Order Charadriiformes - Plovers, Sandpipers, Gulls, Terns, Auks
   Family Laridae - Gulls, Terns, and Skimmers
      Subfamily Larinae - Gulls

  Charadriiforms are a diverse group of shore and aquatic or wading or terrestrial birds. They include the sandgrouse, shore birds, gulls and terns, and alcids. The majority breed in the Northern Hemisphere.
   The Tree of Life includes shorebirds with the Ciconiiformes.
Gulls and Terns are found along seacoasts and most inland bodies of water around the world.
Gulls have three webbed toes and their toes are not hooked. The tail is rarely forked. The upper margin of the bill is curved and the maxilla overhangs the mandible at the tip. There is no cere. They are gregarious and generally have less spectacular migrations than shorebirds
White-headed Gulls have white heads in the breeding plumage.
     
     
  Mew (Common) Gull, Larus canus
 
  USGS     Wiki     ToL     EoL
        WINTER - Accidental
            MARSH, BEACH, SHORE
 
 
   The Mew Gull is slightly smaller than the Ring-billed Gull which it closely resembles. It has a dark eye and a small greenish bill with a small dark ring near the tip (adults) or a dark tip (immatures). In flight, there are large white spots on the wing-tips (outer primaries).
Mew Gull Mew Gull
   
Mew Gulls
   
Potter Marsh, Anchorage, AK. Note chick. Photos by Ed Konrad
   
  NOTES:
   Potter: There are two populations of this species on the East Coast. The short-billed (American) Mew Gull, L. c. brachyrhynchus breeds in Alaska and western Canada. This population is seldom seen in the east - one was found on Ocracoke in 1983. The Common (European) Mew Gull, L. c. canus (Europe and Asia) is more likely to be found on our coast. There are winter reports from the Hatteras area. See Sibley for the distinctions among these populations.
  ●  Accidental.
   
   
   
   
 




       
NEXT
 

KEY:    ■ Seabrook list     □ Kiawah list