Birds of Seabrook Island

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ANECDOTES

  Loggerhead Shrike
 
 

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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Corvida (Superfamily Corvoidea)
            Family Laniidae - True Shrikes
  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Corvida (Corvoidea) includes a group of older endemics originating in Australia and New Guinea.
Shrikes are passerines that are active predators on small vertebrates and large insects. They have a strong bill with a sub-terminal notch used to kill prey.
     
     
  Loggerhead Shrike, Lanius ludovicianus
 
   Cornell     USGS     Wiki     EoL
        YEAR ROUND Uncommon, breeds? / Uncommon
           EDGES, OPEN COUNTRY, FIELDS
MORE PICTURES
 
   The Loggerhead Shrike is a gray bird with a white throat and a black mask extending from the bill over the ears. The bill is dark and conical. The tail is rounded and the outer feathers are white tipped. There is a white patch in the wing at the base of the primaries. Their pattern reminds you of a mockingbird but they are chunkier with a shorter neck.
Loggerhead Shrike
     
Loggerhead Shrike. Village.
Note hooked and notched bill
   
  RANGE: Loggerhead Shrikes breed from the central Atlantic states, northward (west of the Great Lakes) to central Alberta and south to the California coast, Mexico and the Gulf coast east to Florida. In winter they leave the more northern parts of their range and winter  south to central Mexico. They are restricted to the New World.
  BREEDING: Monogamous. 2-3 broods in the south. Both sexes help build a cup-shaped nest, usually below the crown in a crotch or on a large branch. The nest is bulky and is made of twigs, bark, forbs - all woven together - and lined with fine materials. Females lay 5-6 (4-8) eggs which they incubate for 16-17 days. The male feeds the incubating female. Young are altricial. They fledge at 17-21 days of age. Both sexes feed the young for 3-4 weeks post-fledging.
   Both sexes maintain separate territories during the non-breeding season.
  DIET: Shrikes feed on insects, and small birds, mice, and lizards. Their claws are sharp but not "raptorial." They may stun flying birds with a blow from their beak. They may cache prey by impaling it on a spine or barbed wire. In addition to storing food, impaled items are immobilized while they are eaten. Note that they are also called "butcher birds."
  VOICE: Sharp, precise mechanical phrase "krrDI" or "JEEuk." repeated many times at short intervals.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Seabrook (breeds?). Kiawah - uncommon spring through fall (breeds), rare winter. Edisto - winter.
      Coastal - fairly common permanent resident. Hilton Head - uncommon permanent resident.
         Cape Romain
- common/common (breeds)/occasional/common. Huntington Beach - rare, year-round.
      Caw Caw - uncommon year-round, breeds. ACE - uncommon year-round, breeds
   Kiawah Island banding - Capn' Sam's spit - 1 Feb 2012.
   CBC: ACE 7, 10, 5, 8, 8, 3, 0, 4; Charleston 6, 5, 5, 7, 6, 1, 6, 2;
            Hilton Head 3, 2, 3, 2, 3, 4, 1, 1; Sun City/Okatie 3, 2, 5, 10, 9, 7, 7, 4;
            McClellanville 1, 2, 1, 1, nc, 2, 2, 2; Winyah Bay x, x, 1, 0, 3, 2, 2, 2; Litchfield/Pawley's 11, 5, 13, 3, 2, 4, 2, 3.
   SCBBA: Most counties south of the foothillst.
   P&G: Uncommon resident, fewer in winter. Species may have decreased since the 1940s. Maximum: 87, Santee NWR, 30 December 1961. Egg dates: 13 March - 29 June.
   M&P: Most numerous in the northeast upper coastal plain. Resident populations augmented by migrants in the fall. Recent counts suggest that winter populations may now be stable.
   Avendex: 1 published report.
   Potter: Uncommon resident. Probably not at its former level before numbers were reduced by pesticides.
  ●  Relatively common, especially in winter. I have seen shrikes in winter on Seabrook at the Club, on North Beach, and most frequently on the fence or in the small live oaks on Seabrook Island Road by the Equestrian Center. In the winter, they often sally from their perch to "flycatch" large insects. They are potential breeders on Seabrook (several nests have been recorded on Kiawahn) but I haven't seen them in summer.
   Shrikes are quite attracted to small buntings (juncos and tree sparrows) caught in traps in winter. By placing a drop-door (Potter) trap at the edge of the larger maze trap, I have captured them for banding. They are not "happy campers" in the hand.
       
    Banner - Loggerhead Shrike.
       
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