Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
  Contents
  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  American Magpie
 
 

BACK - NEXT

 

Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

TOP

       
  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Corvida (Superfamily Corvoidea)
            Family Corvidae - Jays and Crows
  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Corvida (Corvoidea) includes a group of older endemics originating in Australia and New Guinea.
Corvids are intelligent, social birds. They are larger passerines found in woodlands and open areas. Adults are noisy and aggressive with distinctive calls.
Magpies (Pica). Magpies are sociable birds of open country, feeding on the ground or flying from tree-to-tree with their white wing patches flashing.
     
     
  Black-billed (American) Magpie, Pica hudsonia
 
   Cornell     USGS     Wiki     EoL
        OCCURRENCE? - Hypothetical
            OPEN FIELDS, SCRUB
 
 
   The Black-billed Magpie is a large bird with a long, graduated tail. The rump, tail, and secondaries are steel blue and the scapulars and belly are white. The back, head and throat are black and the stout bill are also black. This is a wide-spread corvid of open country in the west (plains and mountains north to Alaska).
   The Yellow-billed Magpie, Pica nuttalli, differs only in the color of its bill (yellow, of course). This species has a much smaller range in coastal and central California. These two species are probably more closely related to each other than to the European (Common) Magpie, Pica pica, which more closely resembles the black-billed form.
Magpie
     
Black-billed Magpie. Anchorage, AK.
Photo by Ed Konrad
  NOTES:
   Potter, et al., 1980, cite a 1960 winter record in Chapel Hill and list the species as hypothetical. They do not include the species in their 2006 book but it is indexed (amid the vireos)...the joys of authorship! I suspect they intended to omit this species in the latest edition.
  ●  Don't count on finding a magpie on Seabrook. Hypothetical.
   
   
   
   
   
 


       
NEXT
 

KEY:    ■ Seabrook list     □ Kiawah list