Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Carolina Wren
 
 

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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Sylvioidea)
         Family Troglodytidae - Wrens

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Sylvioidea includes nuthatches, creepers, wrens, tits, kinglets, and Old World Warblers.
Wrens are New World birds (one species reaches the Old World). They are small with short wings and thin, down curved bills with dull brown/rufous streaked plumage. Their long tail is often held upright. They nest in cavities or build a domed nest with a side entrance. Many have loud, ringing songs. 
     
     
  Carolina Wren, Thryothorus ludovicianus
 

    Cornell     USGS     Wiki     EoL

        YEAR ROUND Common, breeds / Common
            WOODLANDS, THICKETS, PARKS, URBAN AREAS
MORE PICTURES
 
   The Carolina Wren is a large-headed, stocky wren with brownish red plumage and a black-bordered line over the eye extending to the neck. Their bill is thin, relatively short and is curved. They are very active birds with a quick flight
Carolina Wren
     
Carolina Wren. Clemson
   
  RANGE: Carolina Wrens are confined to eastern North America, ranging from lower New England  through the lower Great Lakes to the eastern edge of Iowa, central Nebraska, and southern Texas to southeastern Mexico and east along the Gulf, through Florida and back up the East Coast.
  BREEDING: Monogamous. Two (3 in the south) broods. Carolina Wrens (both sexes) build a nest in a natural hole, tree roots, brush piles, or in many human structures including mailboxes, wood-piles, artificial flowers in a pot on a screened porch (they found a hole squirrels made to get in and out), in a fertilizer spreader, etc. The nest is made of twigs, bark, leaves, and grass and is lined with fine materials Females lay 4-5 (3-8) eggs which she incubates for 12-16 days. Young are altricial and fledge after 12-14 days. Both parents care for them.
   The male prepares a new nest and feeds young of the first clutch while the female begins a second brood. Pairs remain together throughout the year and maintain territories.
  DIET: Carolina Wrens eat invertebrates, small vertebrates and a few seeds - but concentrate on insects. They cannot crack sunflower seeds but are frequent visitors to feeders where they retrieve shards left by cardinals, chickadees, and titmice. They also visit feeders for suet. They usually forage in pairs, exploiting low tangles, dense foliage, tree trunks and branches, and the ground. They usually maintain a dialogue as the feed.
  VOICE: They song is varied and includes the ringing, "chortalie, chortalie, chortalie," heard around Seabrook. They also chatter and utter a buzzy complaining note. A male may have 27-41 different song types, repeating one for a long session of activity - they may be matched in song type by a neighboring male. Male and female wrens also engage in duets.
   Their song and other sounds can be confused with the "birdie, birdie, birdie" of the Northern Cardinal or other notes - listen and learn. Watch them and you will see them "talk" to you.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Seabrook (breeds). Kiawah - common year round (breeds). Edisto - resident.
      Coastal - common permanent resident. Hilton Head - common permanent resident. Cape Romain - common year-round, breeds.
         Huntington Beach
- common, year-round
      Caw Caw - common year-round, breeds. ACE - abundant year-round, breeds.
   Kiawah Island banding - Capn' Sam's spit - 10 (9 recaptures) Jul-Nov 2009; (6 recaptures) Apr-May 2010; 9 (14 recaptures) Aug-Nov 2010;
      3 (4 recaptures) Apr-May 2011; 4 (11 recaptures) Aug-Nov 2011; 6 (13 repeats) Aug-Sep 2012. Cougar Island - 11 (10 repeats) Sep-Nov 2009.
   CBC: ACE 102, 39, 134, 104, 95, 103, 136, 63; Charleston 137, 98, 44, 77, 47, 129, 45, 131;
            St Helena/Fripp x, x, x, x, x, x, 78, 71; Hilton Head 173, 313, 218, 289, 250, 158, 148, 204; Sun City/Okatie 78, 205, 72, 226, 72, 109, 131, 97;
            McClellanville 37, 60, 58, 47, nc, 43, 83, 62; Winyah Bay x, x, 20, 81, 35, 63, 34, 25; Litchfield/Pawley's 95, 173, 64, 100, 38, 123, 167, 153.
   SCBBA: All counties.
   P&G: Common resident. Maximum; winter, 135, Awendaw / Cape Romain, 2 January 1966. Egg dates: 21 March - 28 June.
   Avendex: 1 report (maximum, above)
   Potter: Common Permanent resident. Mated pairs remain together from year-to-year.
  ●  Common. Carolina Wrens are usually found in low vegetation and edges and thus characterize the myrtle areas leading to the beach. They can be heard at any time during the year anywhere on the island. If the pelican characterizes the beach, the Carolina Wren (and titmouse? - or maybe the cardinal?) - characterize the rest of our island.
       
    Banner - Carolina Wren. Clemson.
       
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