Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Golden-crowned Kinglet
 
 

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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Sylvioidea)
         Family Regulidae - Kinglets, Goldcrests

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Sylvioidea includes nuthatches, creepers, wrens, tits, kinglets, and Old World Warblers.
Kinglets are an Old World group with two New World representatives. They are small, active, cold-hardy  birds with an eye-ring or eye-stripe. Males have a colored crown patch. They are active arboreal foragers, found mainly in conifers.  They are our smallest passerines.
     
     
  Golden-crowned Kinglet, Regulus satrapa
 
    Cornell     USGS     Wiki    EoL
        WINTER - Uncommon - rare / Rare
            MIXED WOODS, CONIFERS
MORE PICTURES
 
  Golden-crowned Kinglets have a boldly striped face and crown with an orange crest in males, yellow in females. The crest may be raised in display or when the bird is agitated. They have a dark bar across the base of their secondaries. Their under-parts are pale. They may hang upside down when feeding.
Golden-crowned Kinglet Golden-crowned Kinglet
 
Golden-crowned Kinglets
   
Male. Capn' Sam's Inlet, October
© Kiawah Island Bird Banding
Female. Capn' Sam's Spit, November
© Kiawah Island Bird Banding
   
  RANGE: Golden-crowns breed broadly in the eastern and Rocky Mountains. Their range extends from Newfoundland and the New England coast west across central Canada (below Hudson Bay) to the Alaskan coast and south along the Pacific to southern California. In winter they tend to withdraw into the US from Montana and the Great Lakes south into eastern Mexico but not the Florida peninsula.
  BREEDING: Monogamous. Two broods. They build a nest hung from a limb with an open top and deep cavity. The female uses lichen, moss, down and twigs/leaves to build the nest. She lines it with fine material. She lays 7-9 (5-011) eggs which are incubated for 14-15 days. The male may feed the female during incubation. Young are altricial and leave the nest at about 14-19 days of age. Both parents provide care for the young.
   This kinglet forms loose mixed-species flocks in winter with tits, nuthatches, creepers, warblers and Ruby-crowned Kinglets.
  DIET: The feed on insects, tree sap, berries, spiders, and a few seeds. They forage actively in coniferous forest - spruce fir, and hemlock and less often in pines. They may be found in deciduous trees during migration. They hop among branches, often hanging upside down. They may hover to catch an insect and rarely will flycatch.
  VOICE: Golden-crowned Kinglets have a two-part song, a rising series of high thin notes, followed by a lower, tumbling chickadee-like chatter. Their call is a high, thin , buzzy "sree" or "aee-aww-aee." Those who know this species use this call to find them in winter.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Seabrook. Kiawah - uncommon fall through spring. Edisto - winter.
      Coastal - uncommon winter visitor. Hilton Head - uncommon winter visitor (with thrushes).
         Cape Romain
- occasional/absent/common/common. Huntington Beach - uncommon September - April.
      Caw Caw - rare/absent/uncommon/uncommon. ACE - rare fall, occasional winter.
   Kiawah Island banding - Capn' Sam's spit- 4 Oct-Nov 2010; 6 Oct-Nov 2011.
   CBC: ACE 27, 12, 10, 49, 22, 24, 16, 39; Charleston 13, 38, 22, 68, 7, 53, 73, 22;
            Hilton Head 3, 4, 3, 14, 3, 0, 3, 24; Sun City/Okatie 1, 3, 0, 22, 1, 6, 8, 4;
            McClellanville 6, 28, 61, 25, nc, 66, 61, 48; Winyah Bay x, x, 4, 12, 7, 6, 15, 10; Litchfield/Pawley's 32, 19, 5, 17, 16, 79, 63, 36.
   SCBBA: Oconee and Pickens Counties - mountains.
   P&G: Winter visitor, varying from common to uncommon. 27 September - 29 April.
   Avendex: 1 report.
   Potter: Common permanent resident in hemlock and spruce-fir forest of the mountains. Common winter resident from early October to mid-April, frequenting stands of evergreens and rarely visiting feeders.
  ●  Rare. They should be present on the island in winter and should favor conifers. I have not seen them on Seabrook and am unfamiliar with their song and calls.
       
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