Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Mountain Bluebird
 
 

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Species Acct.
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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Muscicapoidea)
         Family Turdidae - Thrushes

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Muscicapids include waxwings, dippers, thrushes, Old World flycatchers, starlings, and mimids.
Thrushes are medium-sized insectivores that often feed on the ground and are known for their songs. They have slender bills and robust legs - the tarsus is covered with a single scale. Their nest is usually an open cup. Young have spotted plumage.
Bluebirds. Found in North America only. Brightly colored birds with soft, musical songs. Bluebirds are hole nesters and compete with wrens and introduced starlings and House Sparrows. They will, however, use nest boxes and are very successful where they are available.
     
     
  Mountain Bluebird, Sialia currucoides
 
    Cornell     USGS     Wiki     EoL
        OCCURRENCE? - Accidental
            MONTANE MEADOWS, PINYON-JUNIPER
 
 
   The Mountain Bluebird overlaps the Western Bluebird in the southern part of its range but it ranges north to central Alaska. It is found in a variety of woodland habitats, subalpine meadows, sage and montane grasslands with scattered trees, and pinyon-juniper woodlands. The adult male is light blue except for a lighter belly. Females may be gray or somewhat rufous but are similar to female Western Bluebirds. Its song is a series of low, burry whistles. Its call is a soft whistle similar to that of other bluebirds but thinner and clearer.  
 
       
  NOTES:
   Avenedx: No record.
   Potter: Cites two records, one in Buncombe Co. in June 1985 and one in Yancey Co. in January 2004. The Mountain Bluebird is a very rare straggler east of the Mississippi River.
  ●  Accidental.
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
       
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