Birds of Seabrook Island

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  Cedar Waxwing
 
 

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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Muscicapoidea)
         Family Bombycillidae - Waxwings

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Muscicapids include waxwings, dippers, thrushes, Old World flycatchers, starlings, and mimids.
Waxwings have soft plumage with waxy red tips on some of the wing feathers. Their bill is flat and notched toward the tip. These are highly social, arboreal birds of more northern forests and they wander erratically outside the breeding season.  
     
     
  Cedar Waxwing, Bombycilla cedrorum
 
   Cornell     USGS     Wiki     EoL
        WINTER - Common (Irregular) / Common
            OPEN WOODLAND, EDGE, PARKS, ORCHARDS (fruiting trees and shrubs)
MORE PICTURES
 
   Cedar Waxwings are small birds with a black mask and a crest. They are a warm brown with a yellowish belly and white under-tail coverts. The tip of the tail is normally yellow (sometimes red) and their may be waxy red on the secondaries.
     
Cedar Waxwings.
Great Smokey Mountains National Park, TN. Photo by Ed Konrad
   
  RANGE: Cedar Waxwings range across North America from Newfoundland, across southern Canada to the West Coast, south in Washington and Oregon and east across the northern states, including the Great Lakes with populations in the Appalachians, reaching the East coast in Virginia. In winter, they move into the US and south to Florida, the Gulf Coast, California and Baja and through Mexico and Central America to central Panama.
  BREEDING: Monogamous. Two broods? Cedar Waxwings (both sexes) build an open cup-shaped nest in conifers. It may be bulky or compact and includes twigs, grass, and moss. The female lays 3-5 (2-6) eggs which the female probably incubates alone for about 12 days. Young are altricial and young fledge after 14-18 days. Both parents feed the young.
  DIET: They feed almost exclusively on sugary fruit but will eat developing fruit and insects, berries, flowers, and tree sap in the spring. Young are fed insects when hatched but berries are added within a few days. They usually forage in flocks.
  VOICE: Their song is a constant series of high, thin "tseee" notes that often call attention to their presence.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Seabrook. Kiawah - uncommon fall, common winter through spring. Edisto - winter.
      Coastal - common winter visitor. Hilton Head - common winter visitor. Cape Romain - common/absent (breeds)/common/common.
         Huntington Beach
- uncommon October - November; common December - April; uncommon May.
      Caw Caw - uncommon/absent/uncommon/uncommon. ACE - uncommon/absent/occasional/common.
   Kiawah Island banding - Capn' Sam;s spit - 1 Mar 2012.
   CBC: ACE 1, 70, 12, 44, 3, 16, 85, 0; Charleston 10, 143, 0, 175, 5, 60, 51, 40;
            St. Helena/Fripp x, x, x, x, x, x, 0, 1; Hilton Head 112, 142, 119, 504, 111, 14, 106; Sun City/Okatie 0, 31, 13, 110, 67, 13, 0, 20;
            McClellanville 0, 12, 25, 28, nc, 24, 31, 20; Winyah Bay x, x, 0, 0, 0, 2, 4, 34;
               Litchfield/Pawley's 60, 134, 16, 238, 103, 49, 37, 65.
   SCBBA: Confirmed breeding Williamsburg Co. A few other records above the fall line.
   P&G: Common winter visitor, very common spring migrant. 10 Septemer - 3 June. Accidental as a breeder. Maximum: 500 (one flock), Charleston, 12 January 1973.
   M&P: Third breeding record in upstate (first two documented by P&G). Range expansion underway?
   Avendex: 1 report (maximum, above)
   Potter: Huge, restless flocks roam the Carolinas in winter.
  ●  Common in winter. Cedar Waxwings are often found in social groups, feeding on hollies and other berries and, later in the year, on buds and young growth. They fly in close-knit groups of 12 or more individuals (>100). They can feed on the myrtle berries along the path leading to the beach. Learn their soft lisping calls and you will find them. Note that they are somewhat irregular - they may be common in some winters, less so in others.
       
    Banner - Cedar Waxwings. Sealoft Villas (George Haskins).
       
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