Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Blue-winged Warbler
 
 

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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Passeroidea)
         Nine-primaried Oscines
            Family Parulidae - Wood-Warblers (New World Warblers)

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Passeroids include the Nine-primaried Oscines, pipits, Old World sparrows, and weavers.
Nine-primaried Oscines include New World warblers, icterids (New World blackbirds), emberizines (buntings), tanagers, cardinalines (cardinals), and fringillines (finches).
New World Warblers are small and mostly arboreal, nine-primaried oscines with slender bills. Many are sexually dimorphic with brightly colored nuptial plumages. More northerly populations are migratory.  Our most obvious permanent resident is the Pine Warbler. Northern Parulas and Yellow-throated Warblers are prominent breeding warblers. In winter, look for the most abundant North American warbler, the Yellow-rumped Warbler, the less abundant Palm Warbler and Orange-crowned Warbler. The Black-and-white Warbler is a common migrant. Many other warblers may be found on Seabrook during migration, especially in the fall when their identification may be difficult.
Vermivora includes relatively plain warblers with simple trilled songs. They lack white tail spots and contrasting wing patterns and their basic and alternate plumages are similar. They nest on or near the ground. They may probe when feeding.
     
     
  □ Blue-winged Warbler, Vermivora cyanoptera
 
   Cornell     USGS     Wiki     EoL
        MIGRATION - Uncommon / Rare
            SECOND GROWTH, OPEN WOODS
 
 
   The Blue-winged Warbler is olive on the back and bright yellow on the throat and belly. The under tail coverts are white. The tail is often flicked open to show white outer tail feathers. There are narrow wing bars. There is a thin, dark eye-line and a yellow forehead. In the adult male, the crown is yellow and the wings are blue-gray with larger wing bars. The song is harsh and buzzy. They are found in brushy second-growth and open woods from the Appalachians north to the Great Lakes and west to Missouri. They may breed in southwestern North Carolina between 1,500 - 2,000 feet. My best looks at them have been in the Oak Openings - a wooded series of old sand dunes left by a retreating Lake Erie. They would be rare migrants on Seabrook. They apparently favor second growth during migration.
Blue-winged Warbler
     
Blue-winged Warbler. Male. October
© Kiawah Island Bird Banding
   
NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Kiawah - rare spring, occasional fall.
      Coastal - uncommon transient. Hilton Head - uncommon migrant. Cape Romain - rare migrant (spring and fall).
         Huntington Beach
- exceptional September.
      Caw Caw - occasional migrant (spring and fall). ACE - rare spring migrant.
   Kiawah Island banding - Capn' Sam's spit - 1 Oct 2009.
   SCBBA: Oconee and Pickens Counties only.
   P&G: Rare fall migrant, very rare in spring. 16 April - 30 April, 10 August - 2 October. Maximum: 6 banded, Mt. Pleasant, 4 September - 21 October 1984.
   Avendex: 9 records. April, August - October. Maximum (above).
   Potter: Spring transients from mid- to late April and fall transients from mid-July to mid-October.
  ●  Rare migrant.
       
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