Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
  Contents
  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  Yellow-throated Warbler
 
 

BACK - NEXT

 

Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

TOP

     
View More Pictures
  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Passeroidea)
         Nine-primaried Oscines
            Family Parulidae - Wood-Warblers (New World Warblers)

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Passeroids include the Nine-primaried Oscines, pipits, Old World sparrows, and weavers.
Nine-primaried Oscines include New World warblers, icterids (New World blackbirds), emberizines (buntings), tanagers, cardinalines (cardinals), and fringillines (finches).
New World Warblers are small and mostly arboreal, nine-primaried oscines with slender bills. Many are sexually dimorphic with brightly colored nuptial plumages. More northerly populations are migratory.  Our most obvious permanent resident is the Pine Warbler. Northern Parulas and Yellow-throated Warblers are prominent breeding warblers. In winter, look for the most abundant North American warbler, the Yellow-rumped Warbler, the less abundant Palm Warbler and Orange-crowned Warbler. The Black-and-white Warbler is a common migrant. Many other warblers may be found on Seabrook during migration, especially in the fall when their identification may be difficult.
Typical Warblers (Dendroica) include many colorful oscines, some of which are very long distance migrants while others remain here. Most have white spots in their tails and breeding males are brighter than females (they are sexually dimorphic) or males in the fall.

     
     
  Yellow-throated Warbler, Setophaga dominica
 
   Cornell    USGS     Wiki     EoL
        YEAR ROUND - Fairly common (few winter), breeds / Fairly common
            PINES, CYPRESS SWAMPS, RIPARIAN WOODLANDS, LIVE OAKS (often near water)
MORE PICTURES
 
   Yellow-throated Warblers are boldly-patterned with wing bars, a bright yellow throat and white belly with streaks on the flank. There is a white line above the eye and a black and white face. The outer tail feathers are white when seen in flight but this species is usually seen foraging, often high in pines or live oaks. 
Yellow-throated Warbler
 
Yellow-throated Warber. Adult male.
Photo courtesy Marie Wardell
   
  RANGE: The Yellow-throated Sparrow breeds from central Pennsylvania south and from Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Iowa south to eastern Texas and east along the Gulf coast to central Florida and north along the Atlantic coast. It winters in southern Florida and eastern Mexico south through the Greater Antilles and the Caribbean slope to Costa Rica. Some remain along the immediate coast south from the Carolinas to Florida.
  BREEDING: Monogamous. Two broods in the south. Their nest is often buried in Spanish moss (or is on a high horizontal pine branch). The female builds (with some help) a cup-shaped nest using grass, bark, weed stems, silk, and plant down. It is lined with down and some feathers. She lays 4 (4-5) eggs which are incubated 12-13 days, mostly by the female. Young are altricial. Both parents feed the young.
   In the case of both the Pine and Yellow-throated Warbler, information about behavior, reproduction, diet, etc. is sparse. It is difficult to follow the activities of arboreal warblers so they have been little studied.
  DIET: The diet includes insects and spiders but is not well known. When foraging, they creep along on branches and trunks. They probe crevices with their long bill. They also flycatch.
  VOICE: Their song is loud and consists of a series of clear, but gentle, whistles descending with rapid notes at the end. If you say "yellow-throated-warblerrrrr" you are close to the cadence of the song but not the phonetics. Actually, their song is a series of relatively loud sweet clear whistles, descending and then ascending - they don't really say their name but it helps me remember the song pattern.
  NOTES:
   Checklists -
      Seabrook (breeds). Kiawah - uncommon spring through fall, occasional winter. Edisto - summer.
      Coastal - fairly common permanent resident. Hilton Head - fairly common permanent resident. Cape Romain - common year-round, breeds.          Huntington Beach - uncommon April - November.
      Caw Caw - common/common (breeds)/common/uncommon. ACE - accidental/common (breeds)/common/occasional.
   CBC: ACE 0, 0, 0, 1, 1, 1, 2, 3; Charleston 1, 0, 0, 0, 0, 0, 1, 0;
            St Helena/Fripp x, x, x, x, x, x, 1, 2; Hilton Head 7, 22, 3, 11, 38, 3, 14, 28; Sun City/Okatie 28, 124, 12, 4, 63, 1, 4, 49;
            Winyah Bay x, x, 0, 1, 2, 1, 1, 0; Litchfield/Pawley's 1, 0, 1, 1, 3, 2, 2, 2.
   SCBBA: All counties.
   P&G: Resident, rare in winter, common other seasons. Egg dates: 21 March - 27 May.
   M&P: Now an uncommon breeder in the mountains below 915 m. Rare to uncommon on the coast in the winter.
   Avendex: 4 records. December, February.
   Potter: Common breeding species throughout the coastal plain. They arrive from early March to early April and depart by late September or early October. They are an uncommon but regular winter resident in southeastern South Carolina. 
  ●  They may be resident year-round on Seabrook in favored habitat. However, they are much more common in spring and summer as migrants and breeders augment the resident population. Those that stay through the winter sing and defend territory (I have heard them at Bear Island WMA in winter, but not on Seabrook).
       
NEXT
 

KEY:    ■ Seabrook list     □ Kiawah list