Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Rosefinches
 
 

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Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

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  Order Passeriformes
   Suborder Passeres - Oscines (Song Birds)
      Parvorder Passerida (Superfamily Passeroidea)
         Nine-primaried Oscines
            Family Fringillidae - Finches
               Subfamily Carduelinae - Carduelines

  Passerines are generally smaller than non-passerines. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young hatch blind with little or no down and spend 10-15 days or so in the nest - development is rapid and parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines are passerines with complex syringeal musculature used to produce varied vocalizations. 
Passeroids include the Nine-primaried Oscines, pipits, Old World sparrows, and weavers.
Nine-primaried Oscines include New World warblers, icterids (New World blackbirds), emberizines (buntings), tanagers, cardinalines (cardinals), and fringillines (finches).
Fringillids are "finches" - arboreal, seed-eating birds absent only from the Australian region. They are mostly small, nine-primaried songbirds. Most species are sociable. They are largely vegetarians - many feed on vegetable matter even when insects are abundant and some feed their young a regurgitated mash that is largely seeds. Some even time their breeding by the availability of food. Many forage in flocks and are generally arboreal rather than ground-feeding. Some finches are irruptive - they tend to remain in the north unless food becomes constrained. They may then flock to our feeders in numbers.
Carduelines are Old and New World seed-eaters, with conical bills. The House Finch, Carpodacus mexicanus, breeds in our area and the American Goldfinch, Carduelis tristis, spends the winter. Our other carduelines are irruptive and few have visited us in recent years.
Rosefinches
     
     
  American Rosefinches (Carpodacus)
 
Wiki 
 
These are small carduelines with a streaked plumage and, at least in adult males, some shade of red on their head and breast. Distinctive calls help separate these species. There are 3 species - Cassin's Finch, C. cassinii, Purple Finch, C. purpureus, and House Finch, C. mexicanus, but only two occur in our area and the House Finch is a recent arrival.
   Males (and, at least in the Purple Finch, older females) have red in their plumage and females are brown and streaked. Here's a summary that may help you identify these species:
 
Trait Purple Finch House Finch
Color (adult) raspberry (bluer) strawberry (redder)
Head large rounded
Malar stripe bold in females absent
  Purple Finch   House Finch
 
Purple Finch - young or female/adult
 
House Finch - male/young or female
  Purple Finch   House Finch
 
 
Skip: Purple Finch
  Skip: House Finch
 
  Banner - Purple Finches (and a cardinal). Clemson
       
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