Birds of the World

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Fulvous Whistling-Ducks
 
 
 

TRAITS
 Ratites
 Tinamous
 Cracids/Galli
 Waterfowl
   Screamers
   Ducks

 Penguins
 Loons
 Grebes
 Procellarids
   Albatrosses
   Petrels
   Storm-Petrels

Totipalmate Swm

   Tropicbirds
   Gannets/Boobies
   Pelicans
   Cormorants
   Anhingas
   Frigatebirds

 
Waders
   Herons
   Ibises
   Storks  

 NW Vultures
 Flamingos
 Raptors
 Gruiformes
   Buttonquail
   Bustards
   Cranes
   Rails

 Shorebirds
   Sandgrouse
   Plovers
   Oystercatchers
   Stilts
   Sandpipers
   Gulls/Terns
   Auks

 Pigeons
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 Turacos
 Cuckoos
 Owls
 Frogmouths
 Nightjars
 Swifts/Humbd
 Colies
 Coraciae

   Hornbills
   Hoopoes
   Trogons
   Rollers
   Kingfishers
   Bee-eaters
   Jacamars/Puffbd

 
Pici
   Honeyguides
   Woodpeckers
   Barbets/Toucans

PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
      Pittas

 NW SUBOSC
   NW Flycatchers

   Becards
   Cotingas
   Manakins
   Antbirds
   Ovenbirds
   Woodcreepers
   Antthrushes
   Tapaculos 

 OSCINES
 Lyre-/Scrub-birds
 Bowerbirds
 Aust. Wrens
 Honeyeaters
 Scrubwrens
 Aust. Robins
 Kinglets
 Shrikes
 Vireos
 Whistlers
 Corvids
 Birds-of-Paradse
 OW Orioles
 Cuckoo-shrikes
 Fantails
 Drongos
 Monarchs
 Bush-shrikes
 Wattle-eyes
 Vangas
 Waxwings
 Dippers
 Thrushes
 OW Flycatchers
 Starlings
 Mimids
 Nuthatches
 N Creepers
 Wrens
 Gnatcatchers
 Tits/Parids
 Larks
 Swallows
 Leaf-Warblers
 Bulbuls
 Cisticolas
 White-eyes
 Babblers
 OW Warblers
 Flowerpeckers
 Sunbirds
 OW Sparrows
 Accentors
 Pipits
 Estridids
 Weavers
 Whydahs
 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

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Anseriformes
 
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Anseriformes
Families: Screamers, Magpie-Goose, Whistling Ducks, (White-backed Ducks)
Family - Ducks, Geese, and Swans
Subfamilies - Geese and Swans, Freckled Duck, Shelducks, True Ducks
Tribes - Perching Ducks, Dabblers, Bay Ducks (Pochards), Sea Ducks, Stiff-tailed Ducks
 
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All species of swans
 
Species:   
White-chinned Pintail
 
Images:   
Tundra Swan, Canada Goose, Mallard, Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Canada Goose, Snow Goose, Common Shelduck, American Wigeon, Wood Duck, Blue-winged Teal, Mallards (dabbling), Canvasbacks, Red-breasted Merganser, Ruddy Duck
Chinese (domestic) Goose - "Jake", Canada Goose, Whooper Swan, Black Swan,
Common Shelduck, Australian Shelduck, Pacific Black Duck, American Wigeon,
Northern Shoveler, Mallard
 
  Family Anhimidae - Screamers
Wiki     ToL     EoL
  3 species, 2 genera (Anhima, Chauna). Neotropical (South America). The Southern Screamer (Chauna torquata) is common on the plains of southern South America. The Horned Screamer (Anhima cornuta), is less common and the Northern Screamer, (C. chavaria) is threatened.
   Screamers were originally thought to be related to the Galli but DNA evidence suggests relations to ducks, most closely to the Magpie Goose. They are the only living birds lacking uncinate processes on their ribs.
   Screamers are found in the lowlands of tropical and subtropical South America in marshes and wet areas. They resemble small turkeys with small heads, chicken-like bills, a big body, and very loud voices. Their pelvic muscles are A(B)XY+ and there is no biceps slip. Flexor tendons are Type 4. The tongue is not fleshy. Their entire body is feathered (there are no apteria), their tongue is not fleshy, and they have 19-20 cervical vertebrae. There are rudimentary webs at the base of their toes and the hallux is long and at the level of the forward-pointing toes. Tarsal scutes are similar to those of geese (small, 6-sided, reaching above the intertarsal joint). They lack a copulatory organ. The skeleton is highly pneumatic (even the toes and fingers have air spaces). There are also air spaces in the skin (it is pneumatic or emphysematous) and amid other body tissues (their flesh is not considered palatable). Flight feathers are not molted at the same time so they do not loose the ability to fly after breeding. Their feather tracts are indistinct. Their wings have two large bony spurs used in territorial defense. All are herbivorous, feeding on water plants, but they may also eat seeds and insects. They typically walk over floating mats of vegetation and rarely swim.
   Screamers are often seen in pairs with the male watching as the family forages. After breeding, adjacent pairs may join to form small flocks. One or both members of the pair typically take flight in the late morning and soar over their breeding area as they call - a loud bugling or honking sound.
   They are monogamous and probably pair for life. Their large nest is built of aquatic plants or sticks, over or near water. They lay 4-7 eggs. Both parents incubate for 40-45 days. The precocial young remain in or near the nest and swim better than they can run.  They fledge at 60-75 days. Parents continue to care for them for a few weeks.
   Domesticated screamers serve as watchdogs with their loud alarm calls alerting their owners to intruders. The Southern Screamer is an agricultural pest, competing for crops. 
 
  Family Anseranatida - Magpie Goose
Wiki     ToL     EoL
  1 species, 1 genus (Anseranas semipalmata). Sibley and Monroe (1990) and Dickinson (2003 and Harris (2009) place the Magpie Goose in a separate family. Clements (2007) includes it with other waterfowl in the Family Anatidae. Northern and eastern Australia, southern New Guinea. This is an old family, diverging before the KT extinction. They may have been a dominant Paleogene waterfowl.
   The Magpie Goose is found along the edges of shallow wetlands or swamps or on flooded grasslands. They are social, often found in large flocks. They rest on earth banks or in mangroves or trees. They feed on land or in submerged mud, tipping (upending) like dabblers. Their diet includes grass, sedge, seeds, bulbs, rhizomes, and other vegetable matter.
   They are relatively large with a long neck. The face is bare and they have a broad, large hooked bill. The crown has a bony protuberance ("peaked"). Their wings are rounded and they have long legs. Their plumage is "pied" - black and white. Unlike other waterfowl, they do not undergo a simultaneous molt. Their feet are partially webbed (semipalmate) and the hind toe (hallux) is long.
   Their breeding is often polygamous - males pairing with two females forming a triad. This arrangement is documented to increase reproductive success. Nests are located in small colonies using rushes and woven vegetation. They usually lay a clutch of 20 (or more - up to 4 females may contribute) and both sexes incubate. Their precocial young leave the nest (nidifugous) within a day of hatching but are guarded and fed by the parents for up to four months.
   Magpie Geese are relatively abundant and they may be hunted in certain areas.  
   
  Sibley and Ahlquist (1990) group screamers and the magpie goose as follows:

   Infraorder Anhimides
   Superfamily Anhimoidea
     FAMILY ANHIMIDAE - Screamers
   Superfamily Anseranatoidea
     FAMILY ANSERANATIDA - Magpie Goose:
        Magpie Goose
- Their plumage is pied (black above, white below). They have a long neck and legs. Their feet are semi-palmate with a long
           hallux (hind-toe) at the same level as the forward-directed toes. There is a bony protuberance on their head. Their flight feathers are molted
           progressively, not simultaneously, and the adult is able to fly during molt. They lay 5-14 eggs. Both sexes incubate. Males often mate with
           two females and triads appear to be more successful than monogamous matings. They are colonial breeders and form large social
           groups when not breeding.
 
  Family Dendrocygnidae - Whistling-Ducks 
   (or Subfamily Dendrocygninae, Family Anatidae)
Wiki     ToL     EoL
  8 species, 1 genus (Dendrocygna) if the White-backed Duck is separated (below). Worldwide, tropics and subtropics.
   Whistling-Ducks (formerly referred to as "tree-ducks") are intermediate between geese and ducks, with long necks, long legs, and big feet. Tarsi are reticulate. They are named for their high, whistling calls which they utter continuously in flight. They are monochromatic (males and females look alike) and both parents incubate and care for the young, often for an extended period. Pairs engage in mutual preening. Adults form long-term pair bonds that may transcend seasons. They nest in tree-cavities (nest boxes) or, more often, on the ground. They may feed day or night and eat mostly seeds and plant material. They are active divers, bobbing up and down as they feed ("popcorn ducks"). They may be seen flying to feeding sites at dusk or heard overhead at night.
   This taxon is placed as a subfamily within the Family Anatidae by the AOU.
Fulvous Whistling-Duck
 
Fulvous Whistling-Duck, Dendrocygna bicolor. Pawley's Island.                                               SI Web Link
 
  (Subfamily Thalassorninae, Family Anatidae) - White-backed Duck
Wiki     ToL     EoL
  1 species, 1 genus (Thalassornis leuconotus). South Africa, Madagascar.
   The White-backed Duck is a distinct species, closely related to whistling-ducks. They are accomplished divers, feeding on bulbs of waterlilies. Sibley and Monroe (1990) include it with the Dendrocygini. Most authors place both of these groups within the Family Anatidae.
   
  Sibley and Ahlquist (1990) classify the Whistling-Ducks as follows:

    Infraorder Anserides
     FAMILY DENDROCYGNIDAE - WHISTLING-DUCKS
Clements (2007) and Harris (2009) include the group with other waterfowl in the Family Anatidae)
       
 










   
  Banner - goose-like feet of Fulvous Whistling-Duck, The Shops, Pawley's Island, SC.