Birds of the World

COAST BIRDS
  Contents
  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  Shy Albatross
 
 
 

TRAITS
 Ratites
 Tinamous
 Cracids/Galli
 Waterfowl
   Screamers
   Ducks

 Penguins
 Loons
 Grebes
 Procellarids
   Albatrosses
   Petrels
   Storm-Petrels

Totipalmate Swm

   Tropicbirds
   Gannets/Boobies
   Pelicans
   Cormorants
   Anhingas
   Frigatebirds

 
Waders
   Herons
   Ibises
   Storks  

 NW Vultures
 Flamingos
 Raptors
 Gruiformes
   Buttonquail
   Bustards
   Cranes
   Rails

 Shorebirds
   Sandgrouse
   Plovers
   Oystercatchers
   Stilts
   Sandpipers
   Gulls/Terns
   Auks

 Pigeons
 Parrots
 Turacos
 Cuckoos
 Owls
 Frogmouths
 Nightjars
 Swifts/Humbd
 Colies
 Coraciae

   Hornbills
   Hoopoes
   Trogons
   Rollers
   Kingfishers
   Bee-eaters
   Jacamars/Puffbd

 
Pici
   Honeyguides
   Woodpeckers
   Barbets/Toucans

PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
      Pittas

 NW SUBOSC
   NW Flycatchers

   Becards
   Cotingas
   Manakins
   Antbirds
   Ovenbirds
   Woodcreepers
   Antthrushes
   Tapaculos 

 OSCINES
 Lyre-/Scrub-birds
 Bowerbirds
 Aust. Wrens
 Honeyeaters
 Scrubwrens
 Aust. Robins
 Kinglets
 Shrikes
 Vireos
 Whistlers
 Corvids
 Birds-of-Paradse
 OW Orioles
 Cuckoo-shrikes
 Fantails
 Drongos
 Monarchs
 Bush-shrikes
 Wattle-eyes
 Vangas
 Waxwings
 Dippers
 Thrushes
 OW Flycatchers
 Starlings
 Mimids
 Nuthatches
 N Creepers
 Wrens
 Gnatcatchers
 Tits/Parids
 Larks
 Swallows
 Leaf-Warblers
 Bulbuls
 Cisticolas
 White-eyes
 Babblers
 OW Warblers
 Flowerpeckers
 Sunbirds
 OW Sparrows
 Accentors
 Pipits
 Estridids
 Weavers
 Whydahs
 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

TOP

 
Procellariiformes - Diomedeidae
 
Skip to:   
Procellariiformes
Families: Albatrosses, Shearwaters, Petrels and Diving Petrels, Storm-Petrels
 
Skip to:   
All albatrosses, Feeding procellariids
 
Species:   
Waved Albatross, Elliott's Storm-Petrel
 
Images:   
Waved Albatross, Cape Petrel, Elliot's Storm-Petrel,
Feeding Group
, Wandering Albatross, Royal Albatross, Shy Albatross, Laysan Albatross,
Westland Petrel, Cape Pigeon, Antarctic Petrel, Dark-rumped Petrel, Galapagos Shearwater
 
  Family Diomedeidae - Albatrosses, Mollymawks
Wiki     ToL     EoL
  14 (13) species, 2 (4) genera. Found in the higher latitudes of both hemispheres (except the North Atlantic). One population (the Waved Albatross) extends from the Southern Hemisphere to the equator. Albatrosses do not migrate. Rather, after breeding they disperse widely at sea. Some may make circumpolar flights in the Southern Hemisphere.
   Diomedea, Phoebetria, Thalassarche
are medium-sized albatrosses of southern waters (9 species - Royal, Wandering, Sooty, Light-mantled, Yellow-nosed, Grey-Headed, Black-browed, Buller's, and Shy). All are relatively similar in appearance and they resemble the Great Black-backed Gull but are larger with longer wings and larger bills. There are also 4 species of North Pacific albatrosses (Laysan, Black-footed, Waved, and Short-tailed Albatrosses, Phoebastria). The Laysan and Black-footed Albatrosses are relatively small for albatrosses (the Short-tailed Albatross is larger). The Waved Albatross breeds on the equator in the Galapagos Islands (Española) . They forage in cold, nutrient-rich waters to the south and along the coast of South America.
   Albatrosses are large birds of the open ocean (they are pelagic birds) with long, narrow wings. Males are larger than females. They are "dynamic soarers," riding the uplift from wave ridges. Some species (Diomedea) have the longest wingspan of any flying bird (up to 138' - 11.5 feet). They have a unique shoulder tendon that locks the extended wing without using any energy (shared by the giant petrels). Unlike loons and grebes, they are at home on land (their legs have a normal position enabling them to stand upright). When taking off, they often look for a headwind or run on land or patter on the surface to reach flight speed. Landings may also be awkward.
   Mollymawks are a group of medium-sized albatrosses belonging to the genus Thalassarche. They are confined to the Southern Hemisphere
   Albatrosses and Mollymawks have very large, heavy bills with single tubes on each side of the culmen (the upper ridge of the bill). Several scales cover the upper mandible and their bills are sharply hooked. They have large supraorbital glands used for osmoregulation. They have large webbed feet (3 toes - palmate) which may extend past the tail in flight. There is no hallux. They feed by picking items from the surface or surface-dipping, alighting on the water and picking up squid, fish, flotsam, offal, and carrion from the surface - they are aided in finding food by a well-developed sense of smell. They also make shallow dives from the wing or surface to feed, using their wings for propulsion (the Light-mantled Albatross may dive as deep as 12.5 m). After finding food, albatrosses usually feed while swimming on the water using their bill to manipulate it. They may also eat carrion and refuse from ships.
   They nest in large colonies on remote oceanic islands, usually breeding for the first time when several years (8-10) old. They are monogamous and may mate for life. Nests range from a platform of sticks and mud to bare ground. They lay one egg and both parents incubate (9-11 weeks). After hatching, parents take turns brooding and feeding at sea. The chick is fed a regurgitated mixture of their normal diet plus stomach oil. After several weeks, the chick is left alone between feedings. Young fly between 5 - 9 months of age, depending on the size of the species. They receive no parental care after leaving the nest (in some species, the chicks simply depart when ready). Since the breeding cycle in the largest albatrosses takes more than a year, they only nest in alternate years at most. Smaller species may also skip a year. They may live for 40-50 years. 
 
  Feeding Procellariids
 
Feeding procellariids
Feeding group -- albatrosses and Cape Pigeons. The albatross on the left is probably a Salvin's (Shy) Mollymawk, Diomedea (Thalassarche) cauta, the middle bird is a Royal Albatross, Diomedea epomophora, and the one to the right is a Wandering Albatross, Diomedea exulans. There is a young Lesser Black-backed Gull, Larus fuscus, on the water behind the others. The large group of noisy birds flying and on the surface are Cape (Pigeons) Petrels, Daption capense, a petrel of southern oceans. Kaikoura, NZ.
 
  All Albatrosses:

   Wandering Albatross, Diomedea exulans. Southern oceans.
   Royal Albatross, Diomedea epomophora. Circumpolar soutern oceans.
   Short-tailed Albatross, Phoebastria albatrus. Breeds Izu Islands, ranges circumpolar northern oceans
   Waved Albatross, Phoebastria irrorata. Breeds Galapagos and Isla La Plata (Ecuador).
   Laysan albatross, Phoebastria immutabilis. Breeds w. Hawaiian and Revillagigedo Islands, ranges north Pacific.
   Black-footed Albatross, Phoebastria nigripes. W Hawaiian, Izu, Bonin, s Ryukyu Islands.
   Gray-headed Albatross, Thalassarche chrysotoma. Circumpolar high southern latitutes, ranging north to 35 S.
   Black-browed Albatross, Thalassarche melanophris. Islands off New Zealand, Cape Horn Archipelago to Antipodes Islands.
   Buller' Albatross, Thalassarche bulleri. Breeds off New Zealand, ranges southern Pacific.
   Shy Albatross, Thalassarche cauta. Breeds Tasmania, Aukland, Chatham, Crozet, Snares, and Bounty Islands.
   Yellow-nosed Albatross, Thalassarche chlororhynchos. Trustan da Cunha and Gouch Islands, s Indian Ocean islands, ranges southern
       oceans
   Sooty Albatross, Phoebetria fusca. S Atlantic Ocean and Indian Ocean, north to about 30 S.
   Light-mantled Albatross, Phoebetria palpebrata. Circumpolar subantarctic islands, ranges north to 35 S.
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
 
















   
  Banner - Shy Albatross (with Cape Petrel and Westland Petrel). Kaikoura, NZ