Birds of the World

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Frigatebirds
 
 
 

TRAITS
 Ratites
 Tinamous
 Cracids/Galli
 Waterfowl
   Screamers
   Ducks

 Penguins
 Loons
 Grebes
 Procellarids
   Albatrosses
   Petrels
   Storm-Petrels

Totipalmate Swm

   Tropicbirds
   Gannets/Boobies
   Pelicans
   Cormorants
   Anhingas
   Frigatebirds

 
Waders
   Herons
   Ibises
   Storks  

 NW Vultures
 Flamingos
 Raptors
 Gruiformes
   Buttonquail
   Bustards
   Cranes
   Rails

 Shorebirds
   Sandgrouse
   Plovers
   Oystercatchers
   Stilts
   Sandpipers
   Gulls/Terns
   Auks

 Pigeons
 Parrots
 Turacos
 Cuckoos
 Owls
 Frogmouths
 Nightjars
 Swifts/Humbd
 Colies
 Coraciae

   Hornbills
   Hoopoes
   Trogons
   Rollers
   Kingfishers
   Bee-eaters
   Jacamars/Puffbd

 
Pici
   Honeyguides
   Woodpeckers
   Barbets/Toucans

PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
      Pittas

 NW SUBOSC
   NW Flycatchers

   Becards
   Cotingas
   Manakins
   Antbirds
   Ovenbirds
   Woodcreepers
   Antthrushes
   Tapaculos 

 OSCINES
 Lyre-/Scrub-birds
 Bowerbirds
 Aust. Wrens
 Honeyeaters
 Scrubwrens
 Aust. Robins
 Kinglets
 Shrikes
 Vireos
 Whistlers
 Corvids
 Birds-of-Paradse
 OW Orioles
 Cuckoo-shrikes
 Fantails
 Drongos
 Monarchs
 Bush-shrikes
 Wattle-eyes
 Vangas
 Waxwings
 Dippers
 Thrushes
 OW Flycatchers
 Starlings
 Mimids
 Nuthatches
 N Creepers
 Wrens
 Gnatcatchers
 Tits/Parids
 Larks
 Swallows
 Leaf-Warblers
 Bulbuls
 Cisticolas
 White-eyes
 Babblers
 OW Warblers
 Flowerpeckers
 Sunbirds
 OW Sparrows
 Accentors
 Pipits
 Estridids
 Weavers
 Whydahs
 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

TOP

 
Pelecaniformes
 
Skip to:   
Pelecaniformes
Families: Tropicbirds, Gannets and Boobies, Pelicans, Cormorants, Anhingas, Frigatebirds,
      Hamerkop, Shoebill
 
Skip to:  
All Tropicbirds, All Sulids, All Pelicans, All Cormorants, All Anhingas, All Frigatebirds,
Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge
 
Skip to:  
Plunge Diving, Relative Sizes of Pelicans, Identifying Frigatebirds
 
Species:   
Red-tailed Tropicbird, Blue-footed Booby, Nazca Booby, Australian Pelican,
Brown Pelican (Galapagos), Peruvian Pelican. Pied Cormorant, Pelagic Cormorant,
Brandt's Cormorant
, Neotropic Cormorant, Rock Cormorant, Imperial Cormorant,
Red-legged Cormorant, Flightless Cormorant, Great Frigatebird
 
Images:   
Red-billed Tropicbird, Blue-footed Booby, Brown Pelican, Double-crested Cormorant,
Anhinga, Magnificent Frigatebird, Totipalmate toes, Gular pouch, Red-billed Tropicbirds, Masked Booby, Northern Gannet, Brown Pelican. Anhinga, Great Frigatebird
 
  Family Fregatidae - Frigatebirds (Man-o'-War Birds)
Wiki     ToL     EoL
EXAMPLE
  5 species, 1 genus (Fregatta). Tropical and subtropical areas of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Oceans. There is a suggestion that frigatebirds may be related to petrels?
   Frigatebirds are medium-sized birds with a long, hooked and robust beak with lateral grooves. The gular pouch is large and naked - it becomes bright red in adult males and can be inflated like a balloon using air from the anterior air sacs. It is used in courtship display and may or may not be homologous with the gular pouches of other totipalmate swimmers. The bill is long and hooked at the tip. Their nostrils are linear and are closed or nearly closed (located in grooves at the base of the bill). Frigatebirds have extremely long and pointed wings, angled at the carpal joint. Their tail is long and forked. They are, however, relatively light - the heaviest is only about 3.5 lb in weight. They are magnificent gliders, hanging in the air for hours. Their legs are short The webbing between their toes is reduced to the basal region and their nails are long and claw-like facilitating perching in trees or on man-made structures. The middle toe is pectinate (comb-like) on its inner margin. Their tarsi are short and feathered. Palatines are fused at the posterior end only and there is a large vomer. There is no nasal hinge. The furcula fuse dorsally with the head of the coracoid, ventrally with the carina sterni - unique in birds.
 
Great Frigatebird
   Males are black (some have some white on the belly) with a bright red gular sac. Females have lighter underparts
   Frigatebirds may pluck fish, squid, or offal from the water's surface. They are also aerial pirates, visiting seabird feeding flocks and stealing their meals (from pelicans, boobies, gulls, terns, and others) - kleptoparasitism.
    We have watched them feed on emerging green turtles as they hatch. They forage along coasts, but also occur widely at sea. Juveniles may wander into temperate latitudes. They may perch on ships or terrestrial structures but never on water.
   Frigatebirds are monogamous and form large breeding colonies, often in mangroves along the shore. They tend to breed every other year. They build a nest of sticks. They lay 1 (2) eggs which is (are) incubated 6-8 weeks. Both parents feed for the first 3 months but the female continues to feed for another 8 months.
   Frigatebirds have the longest wings relative to weight of any bird - they soar gracefully and high over the water, never landing on its surface. Frigatebirds never swim - their feathers are wettable (like the cormorant and anhinga) and they are unable to take off from water.
 
Great Frigatebird, Fregta minor.
Floreana, Galapagos
                       SI Web      Wiki     ToL     EoL
 
 
All Frigatebirds:

   Magnificent Frigatebird, Fregatta magnificens. Pelagic, breeding on islands. Tropical Pacific from Baja California to Ecuador and the
      Galapagos. In the Atlantic - Caribbean region, the species extends from the central coast of Texas and the Yucatan Peninsula and Belize to
      the Bahamas, Antilles, Caymans and locally south along the Brazilian Coast. Ranges widely at sea. Click for pictures.
   Ascension Frigatebird, Fregatta aquila. Pelagic, breeding on rocky ground and ledges, Ascension Island. Ranges at sea  to western African
      coast.
   Great Frigatebird, Fregatta minor. Pelagic, breeding on islands in trees. Central and western Pacific Ocean, Indian Ocean, and off eastern
      Brazil in the Atlantic. Ranges widely in western, central and southwestern Pacific. Click for pictures.
   Lesser Frigatebird, Fregatta ariel. Pelagic, breeding on islands in bushes. Tropical South Pacific off Australia to New Caledonia and Fiji,
      Tonga, and the Society Islands. Breeds in the south Atlantic Ocean on Trinidade and Martin Vaz Rocks and in the western Indian Ocean on
      Aldabra and the Comoro Islands. Ranges widely in the western Pacific and Indian Ocean.
   Christmas Frigatebird, Fregatta andrewsi. Pelagic, breeding on Christmas Island in tall trees. Ranges from eastern  Indian Ocean to the
      South China Sea and northern Australia.
 
  Family Scopidae - Hamerkop
Wiki     ToL     EoL
    See listing under "waders." The most recent thinking places this species with the pelecaniformes. The hamerkop has an incumbent hallux and the bases of the inner and outer toes are webbed. There is no gular pouch. One species, 1 genus. Scopus umbretta
 
  Family Balaenicipitridae - Shoebill (Whale-headed Stork)
Wiki     ToL     EoL
    See listing under "waders." . Shoebills have a long hallux and the foretoes are not webbed. There is no gular pouch. One species, 1 genus. Balaeniceps rex. The Encyclopedia of Life places the shoebill in the Family Pelecanidae within the Ciconiiformes.
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
       
 

















   
  Banner - Magnificent Frigatebird (young). North Seymour. Galapagos.