Birds of the World

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Galbuliformes
 
 
 

TRAITS
 Ratites
 Tinamous
 Cracids/Galli
 Waterfowl
   Screamers
   Ducks

 Penguins
 Loons
 Grebes
 Procellarids
   Albatrosses
   Petrels
   Storm-Petrels

Totipalmate Swm

   Tropicbirds
   Gannets/Boobies
   Pelicans
   Cormorants
   Anhingas
   Frigatebirds

 
Waders
   Herons
   Ibises
   Storks  

 NW Vultures
 Flamingos
 Raptors
 Gruiformes
   Buttonquail
   Bustards
   Cranes
   Rails

 Shorebirds
   Sandgrouse
   Plovers
   Oystercatchers
   Stilts
   Sandpipers
   Gulls/Terns
   Auks

 Pigeons
 Parrots
 Turacos
 Cuckoos
 Owls
 Frogmouths
 Nightjars
 Swifts/Humbd
 Colies
 Coraciae

   Hornbills
   Hoopoes
   Trogons
   Rollers
   Kingfishers
   Bee-eaters
   Jacamars/Puffbd

 
Pici
   Honeyguides
   Woodpeckers
   Barbets/Toucans

PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
      Pittas

 NW SUBOSC
   NW Flycatchers

   Becards
   Cotingas
   Manakins
   Antbirds
   Ovenbirds
   Woodcreepers
   Antthrushes
   Tapaculos 

 OSCINES
 Lyre-/Scrub-birds
 Bowerbirds
 Aust. Wrens
 Honeyeaters
 Scrubwrens
 Aust. Robins
 Kinglets
 Shrikes
 Vireos
 Whistlers
 Corvids
 Birds-of-Paradse
 OW Orioles
 Cuckoo-shrikes
 Fantails
 Drongos
 Monarchs
 Bush-shrikes
 Wattle-eyes
 Vangas
 Waxwings
 Dippers
 Thrushes
 OW Flycatchers
 Starlings
 Mimids
 Nuthatches
 N Creepers
 Wrens
 Gnatcatchers
 Tits/Parids
 Larks
 Swallows
 Leaf-Warblers
 Bulbuls
 Cisticolas
 White-eyes
 Babblers
 OW Warblers
 Flowerpeckers
 Sunbirds
 OW Sparrows
 Accentors
 Pipits
 Estridids
 Weavers
 Whydahs
 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

TOP

 
Coraciae: Galbuliformes - Jacamars, Puffbirds
 
Skip to:   
Coraciae
Bucerotiformes - Hornbills, Ground Hornbills
Upupiformes - Hoopoes, Wood Hoopoes, Scimitar-bills
Trogoniformes - Trogons
Coraciiformes -
   Rollers, Ground-Rollers, Cuckoo-Rollers
   Motmots, Todies, Kingfishers, Bee-eaters
Galbuliformes - Jacamars, Puffbirds
 
Images:   
Great Hornbill, Eurasian Hoopoe, Narina Trogon, Quetzal, Collared Trogon,
Violaceous Trogon, White-tailed Trogon, Indian Roller, Tody, Laughing Kookaburra,
White-throated Kingfisher
, Stork-billed Kingfisher, Collared Kingfisher, European Bee-eater,
Rufous-tailed Jacamar, Puffbird
 
  Order Galbuliformes - Jacamars and Puffbirds
Wiki     EoL
  These are insect-eating forest dwellers ranging from Mexico to tropical South America. They are desmognathous with a long, thin normal tongue. There are two carotids; the oil gland is naked and bilobed; they have complete furcula, the caeca are long and globose, and their wing coverts are non-oscine (the middle covert row is absent or imperfectly developed). Their aftershaft is vestigial or reduced. The have 10 primaries, 10-12 secondaries, and 12 tail feathers. Their feet are zygodactyl (two toes forward, two to the rear).
   This group may be placed with the Coraciae, between them and the Pici, or as the lead taxa within the Piciformes. Stay tuned!
 
  Family Galbulidae - Jacamars
Wiki     ToL     EoL
 
18 species, 5 genera. Neotropics - southern Mexico to northern Argentina in tropical and subtropical forest. 
   Jacamars are colorful and active. All catch insects on the wing and resemble Old World bee-eaters. They are relatively small to medium-sized birds. They have long and pointed slender bills. The gonys (keel of the lower mandible) is carinate and they have no vomer. Their legs are short. Their tarsi are smooth behind and their feet are zygodactyl. The front toes are fused at the base (syndactylous). The hind toe is absent in the Three-toed Jacamar, Jacamaralcyon tridactyla, and reduced in Brachygalba
    Many have soft metallic green plumage with gold or bronze reflections (Galbula). Sexes are similar. They have a short aftershaft (as do Puffbirds). They have 10 primaries (with the outer reduced). Most have long rounded tails.
   Jacamars are often solitary or found in pairs. They perch upright with the tail pointing down and the bill held at an angle. Most use open perches, but some perch on bare branches. All hunt by sitting, they flying out to catch prey on the wing - flycatching. They may "wipe" their prey on a branch to remove stings. They feed on large insects including grasshoppers, beetles, butterflies and moths, and stinging insects (and, occasionally, small vertebrates (Great Jacamar, Jacamerops aureus). They are found in lowland forests, preferring edges and clearings (or drier areas of the Atlantic forest in Brazil). All species are sedentary.
   Most species are monogamous (the Three-toed Jacamar may breed colonially; cooperative breeding has been suggested). Males perform displays to attract females. They nest in burrows excavated by both parents (earthen banks, aerial termite nests). Some nests may be used as roosts at other times. Clutches typically include 2-4 white eggs. Altricial nestilings hatch with down - unique if this group is included with the Pici (woodpeckers). Young fledge in 20-36 days. Some jacamars may raise two broods.
 
Rufous-tailed Jacamar
Rufoous-tailed Jacamar

Rufous-tailed Jacamar
,
Galbula ruficauda,
Gilpin Trace, Tobago
Wiki     EoL     ToL
Photos by Ed Konrad
 
  Family Bucconidae - Puffbirds
Wiki     ToL     EoL
 
33 (35) species, 10 genera (Sibley and Monroe, 1990, Clements, 2007). Dickinson ()2003) and Harris (2009) list 55 species, 12 genera. Southern Mexico to northern Argentina in tropical forest.
   Puffbirds are small, stocky Neotropical birds of lowland forests. They tend to perch with their feathers fluffed - hence their name. Typical puffbirds include Notharchus, Bucco, Nystalus, Hypnelus; Malacoptila - streaked plumage; Micromonacha lanceolata; Nunlets and Nunbird including Nonnula, Monasa, Haptaloptila castanea; and the distinctive Chelidoptera tenebrosa, the Swallow-winged Puffbird.
   Puffbirds are relatively small and stout with a large head and large eyes. Their bill is pointed and  compressed anteriorly with the tip decurved. In many, the tip is forked and the lower mandible fits in this cleft. The gonys is rounded and a vomer is present. All have rictal bristles. Some have additional facial bristles and long throat feathers. They have short wings and a short to medium tail. Their feet are zygodactyl and the tarsi are scutellate behind. Their plumage is full, lax, and dull colored. Feathers have an aftershaft.
   Puffbirds are secretive and are found alone or in small family groups. Nunbirds may form larger, more vocal social groups. They are generally lethargic - sitting quietly while watching for prey. They sally from their perch to strike at food on the ground, on trunks, or flying. They eat a variety of insects and arthropods plus small crabs and velvet worms. Even small lizards or frogs . Some add fruit and berries in their diet. Puffbirds seldom vocalize - nunbirds are somewhat more vocal, using calls to maintain cohesion in groups.
   These species like forested habitats and savannah. They are sedentary.
   Puffbirds are mainly monogamous. They excavate termite nests in trees. Nunbirds and others dig burrows on level or sloping ground. Nunlets use both types of nest site. They lay 2-3 rounded white eggs. Incubation may be about 15 days. Young are altricial but mobile - they crawl to the entrance of the nest to be fed. They fledge in 2-30 days.
   
Puffbird
Puffbird, Monastes fusca?
Brehms Tierleben, 1892.
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

   
     
  Banner - Jacamar and Puffbird (woodcuts). Brehem's Tierleben. 1892.