Birds of the World

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

  Bowerbirds
 
 
 

TRAITS
 Ratites
 Tinamous
 Cracids/Galli
 Waterfowl
   Screamers
   Ducks

 Penguins
 Loons
 Grebes
 Procellarids
   Albatrosses
   Petrels
   Storm-Petrels

Totipalmate Swm

   Tropicbirds
   Gannets/Boobies
   Pelicans
   Cormorants
   Anhingas
   Frigatebirds

 
Waders
   Herons
   Ibises
   Storks  

 NW Vultures
 Flamingos
 Raptors
 Gruiformes
   Buttonquail
   Bustards
   Cranes
   Rails

 Shorebirds
   Sandgrouse
   Plovers
   Oystercatchers
   Stilts
   Sandpipers
   Gulls/Terns
   Auks

 Pigeons
 Parrots
 Turacos
 Cuckoos
 Owls
 Frogmouths
 Nightjars
 Swifts/Humbd
 Colies
 Coraciae

   Hornbills
   Hoopoes
   Trogons
   Rollers
   Kingfishers
   Bee-eaters
   Jacamars/Puffbd

 
Pici
   Honeyguides
   Woodpeckers
   Barbets/Toucans

PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
      Pittas

 NW SUBOSC
   NW Flycatchers

   Becards
   Cotingas
   Manakins
   Antbirds
   Ovenbirds
   Woodcreepers
   Antthrushes
   Tapaculos 

 OSCINES
 Lyre-/Scrub-birds
 Bowerbirds
 Aust. Wrens
 Honeyeaters
 Scrubwrens
 Aust. Robins
 Kinglets
 Shrikes
 Vireos
 Whistlers
 Corvids
 Birds-of-Paradse
 OW Orioles
 Cuckoo-shrikes
 Fantails
 Drongos
 Monarchs
 Bush-shrikes
 Wattle-eyes
 Vangas
 Waxwings
 Dippers
 Thrushes
 OW Flycatchers
 Starlings
 Mimids
 Nuthatches
 N Creepers
 Wrens
 Gnatcatchers
 Tits/Parids
 Larks
 Swallows
 Leaf-Warblers
 Bulbuls
 Cisticolas
 White-eyes
 Babblers
 OW Warblers
 Flowerpeckers
 Sunbirds
 OW Sparrows
 Accentors
 Pipits
 Estridids
 Weavers
 Whydahs
 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

TOP

 
Passeriformes, Oscines, Menuroida - Treecreepers, Bowerbirds
 
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Basal Oscines (Menuroida)
Families: Lyrebirds, Scrub-birds, Treecreepers, Bowerbirds, New Zealand Thrushes
 
Images:   
Satin Bowerbird
   
  Order Passeriformes - Perching Birds
Wiki     ToL     EoL
     Suborder Passeres - "Oscines," Song Birds
Wiki     ToL
  Passerines. Most passerines are smaller than members of non-passerine orders. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one (the hallux) backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young are altricial - they hatch blind with little or no down - and nidicolous - spending 10-15 days or so in the nest.  Subsequent development is rapid and young approach adult mass at fledging. Parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines, Suborder Passeres, are our "song birds" with complex syringeal muscles used to produce varied and complex vocalizations.
Menuroida - ancient songbirds, Australoasian region.
   
  Parvorder (Infraorder) Menuroida (Superfamily Menuroidea)
   Basal Oscines
ToL
  The most ancient songbirds, endemic to Australia                                                                                                                                                                  
   
  " Ptilonorhynchoidea" - Treecreepers and Bowerbirds
The following families are often regarded as being related to the Lyrebirds and Scrub-birds. The cluster also includes the Family Turnagridae (Turnagra), an extinct group of New Zealand birds, the Pipio or New Zealand Thrushes (Wiki). Wikipedia classification places them with the Corvida as passeri incertae sedis. The Tree of Life  groups them as a sister group to the Menuroidae and both of these groups as sister groups to the remainder of the Oscines. Because they are traditionally placed near the basal oscines and, lacking better evidence, I will retain them with the Menuroida. See the Tree of Life cladogram.
 
  Family Climacteridae - Australo-Papuan Treecreepers
Wiki     EoL
  7 (7) species, 2 genera (Climacteris, Cormobates). Six species are Australian (absent in the drier interior), and one occurs in New Guinea.
   They are scansorial and similar to the unrelated Northern Hemisphere creepers (Certhia), the Philippine creepers (?Rhabdornis), and the Afro-Asian Spotted Creeper Salpornis) in their habits. These are relatively small, mostly brownish birds with patterned underparts. They forage actively for insects in or under tree bark (mostly eucalypts), spiraling up one tree then stating at the base of another – several species also hunt on the ground or in leaf-litter. They feed on insects and other invertebrates - ants are a favorite. Several species also eat seeds and other plant material
   Several species are cooperative breeders with two or more nest helpers - often single males. Nests are hidden in tree hollows above the ground. They lay 2-3 eggs which they incubate for 16-18 days. In species that breed cooperatively, young are fed by parents and 2 or more helpers.
 
  Family Ptilonorhynchidae - Bowerbirds
Wiki     EoL
  20 (20) species, 7 genera. Harris (2009) lists 18 species in 8 genera. Not closely related to Birds-of-paradise where they are usually classified. Bowerbirds are centered in the tropical Australo-Papuan region with species extending into central deserts and mountains of southeast Australia and New Guinea. 10 species are found in Australia - 12 are endemic to New Guinea. Most prefer humid forests (the Western Bowerbird, Chlamydera guttata, lives in open woodland in the arid interior). [The family includes 2 species of Ailuroedus - "catbirds" - which are monogamous and do not build bowers.]
   They are medium-sized passerines with stout legs (starling – blue jay-size) and a robust bill that may be hooked or notched. Most are strong fliers. They show relatively plain dark plumages (males) or brownish hues (female) – actually those species that build simple bowers tend to be more brightly colored, those that build the most complex bower are quite plain.
   Bowerbirds are polygynous (except Ailuroedus). The male builds a display arena – it may be a bare patch of ground, a walled walk-way surrounded by vegetation, or a complex “may-pole” built around a trunk. He festoons this “bower” with colored objects – flower petals, junk, broken glass, etc. Different species have different color preferences. The Satin Bowerbird, Ptilonorhynchus violaceus, pictured in the inset (Bird World, Kuranda, Queensland, Australia) likes blue. He immediately accepted a water-bottle cap with a blue lining and added it to the bower. Males are vocal. When females approach, males perform elaborate dances displaying himself and his artwork to the prospective mate. Mating is polygynous and the female builds a robust cup-shaped nest and cares for the egg and young. They lay 1-2 eggs (3 possible in catbirds). Incubation (by the female) lasts 19-25 days and young fledge after 18-22 days. They remain dependent on the female for 60-80 days after fledging.
   Somewhat like  lyrebirds, bowerbirds are adept vocal mimics – picking up sounds of nature in addition to other bird’s calls and animals.
  Satin Bowerbird Satin Bowerbird Satin Bowerbird, Ptilonorhynchus violaceus. Kuranda - Bird World, Australila
                                           Wiki     ToL     EoL
 
  Family Turnagridae - Piopio (New Zealand Thrushes)
   (extinct)
Wiki     EoL
  2 species, 1 genus (Turnagra). New Zealand.
   Thrush-like birds. Now extinct due to extensive deforestation of lowlands. The genus may belong in the Ptilonorhynchidae.
   
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




   
  Banner - Satin Bowerbird. Bird World, Kuranda. Australia.