Birds of the World

COAST BIRDS
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  Index
WORLD BIRDS
  Contents
  Index

ANECDOTES

  Corvids
 
 
 

TRAITS
 Ratites
 Tinamous
 Cracids/Galli
 Waterfowl
   Screamers
   Ducks

 Penguins
 Loons
 Grebes
 Procellarids
   Albatrosses
   Petrels
   Storm-Petrels

Totipalmate Swm

   Tropicbirds
   Gannets/Boobies
   Pelicans
   Cormorants
   Anhingas
   Frigatebirds

 
Waders
   Herons
   Ibises
   Storks  

 NW Vultures
 Flamingos
 Raptors
 Gruiformes
   Buttonquail
   Bustards
   Cranes
   Rails

 Shorebirds
   Sandgrouse
   Plovers
   Oystercatchers
   Stilts
   Sandpipers
   Gulls/Terns
   Auks

 Pigeons
 Parrots
 Turacos
 Cuckoos
 Owls
 Frogmouths
 Nightjars
 Swifts/Humbd
 Colies
 Coraciae

   Hornbills
   Hoopoes
   Trogons
   Rollers
   Kingfishers
   Bee-eaters
   Jacamars/Puffbd

 
Pici
   Honeyguides
   Woodpeckers
   Barbets/Toucans

PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
      Pittas

 NW SUBOSC
   NW Flycatchers

   Becards
   Cotingas
   Manakins
   Antbirds
   Ovenbirds
   Woodcreepers
   Antthrushes
   Tapaculos 

 OSCINES
 Lyre-/Scrub-birds
 Bowerbirds
 Aust. Wrens
 Honeyeaters
 Scrubwrens
 Aust. Robins
 Kinglets
 Shrikes
 Vireos
 Whistlers
 Corvids
 Birds-of-Paradse
 OW Orioles
 Cuckoo-shrikes
 Fantails
 Drongos
 Monarchs
 Bush-shrikes
 Wattle-eyes
 Vangas
 Waxwings
 Dippers
 Thrushes
 OW Flycatchers
 Starlings
 Mimids
 Nuthatches
 N Creepers
 Wrens
 Gnatcatchers
 Tits/Parids
 Larks
 Swallows
 Leaf-Warblers
 Bulbuls
 Cisticolas
 White-eyes
 Babblers
 OW Warblers
 Flowerpeckers
 Sunbirds
 OW Sparrows
 Accentors
 Pipits
 Estridids
 Weavers
 Whydahs
 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

TOP

 
Passeriformes, Oscines, Corvida - Corvids, Satinbirds,
      Birds-of-Paradise
 
Skip to:   
Corvida (-oidea)
Families: Corvidae, Satinbirds, Birds-of-Paradise
 
Species:   
Steller's Jay, Grey Jay, Clark's Nutcracker, Rook, Common Jack-daw, Black-billed Magpie
 
Images:   
Blue Jay
   
  Order Passeriformes - Perching Birds
   Suborder Passeres - "Oscines," Song Birds
Wiki     ToL     EoL
Wiki     ToL
  Passerines. Most passerines are smaller than members of non-passerine orders. They have a perching foot with three toes directed forward and the one (the hallux) backward with locking tendons to facilitate perching when their tendons are flexed. All passerines scratch by bringing the foot over the wing. Incubation ranges from 11 -21 days. Young are altricial - they hatch blind with little or no down - and nidicolous - spending 10-15 days or so in the nest.  Subsequent development is rapid and young approach adult mass at fledging. Parents provide care beyond fledging.
Oscines, Suborder Passeres, are our "song birds" with complex syringeal muscles used to produce varied and complex vocalizations.
Covida. Australasia center with old endemics and radiations including the corvids, Old World orioles, shrikes, and vireos.
   
  Corvids, Satinbirds, Birds-of-Paradise
The following families are placed in the Subfamily Corvinae by Sibley and Ahlquist (1990). Corvids are worldwide except for New Zealand and part of Polynesia - the group is most strongly developed in the Northern Hemisphere. The first three families: Corvidae - crows and corvids, Cnemophilidae - satinbirds, and Paradisaeidae - birds-of-paradise are placed in the Tribe Corvini by Sibley and Ahlquist (1990). Their Tribe Artamini includes three families: Artamidae - woodswallows, Cracticidae - butcherbirds, and Pityriasidae - bristleheads Their Tribe Oriolidae includes: Oriolidae - Old World orioles, and Campephagidae- cuckoo-shrikes). All are shown to be closely clustered by DNA analysis:
 
  Family Corvidae – Crows, Magpies, Jays, Nutcrackers
Wiki    EoL
EXAMPLE
  117 (119)  species, 25 (24) genera. Worldwide distribution except for the tip of South America and the polar icecaps. The Australian representatives appear to be recent colonists. They can be be grouped into several types: jays, ground jays, nutcrackers, crows and ravens, choughs, magpies, and treepies.
   Medium to large birds (the largest passerines are in this family). They occupy a variety of habitats - ranging from desert to woodland, sea level to the highest mountain peaks. Sexes are generally similar and many are monogamous - some may mate for life. Corvids are intelligent birds and are somewhat social. Most have strong bills (they are opportunists and food ranges from corn to other birds' young)...larger corvids are effective predators.  They usually forage on the ground or in low vegetation and are common in urban and agricultural areas.  They tend to be woodland birds, foraging in open areas. Adults are noisy and aggressive (but secretive when nesting).
    They have a stout, compressed, conical bill which is never notched or angulated basally. Rictal bristles are present and stiff, forward-pointing feathers cover the nostrils in most (all but 3 species). Their tarsus is large and strong. Legs are scutellated (multiple scales) on the front but smooth (few scales) to the rear. The hallux is strong but not as long as the middle toe. They have a large 10th primary. Their tail is variable but is never emarginate or forked - it is usually rounded, and often graduated. Most have a distinct juvenal plumage and adults have a single complete post-nuptial molt.
   Both sexes build a bulky, cup-shaped nest placed in trees, cliffs, or even man-made structures. One jay is a hole nester  and one magpie covers their nest. They lay 2-9 eggs, incubated by the female for 14-25 days (usually beginning after the first egg is laid so hatching is asynchronous). The male feeds the female on the nest and the female and young while brooding. Chicks fledge in 17-42 days and are cared for by both parents for as little as a week or as long as 9 months after fledging. Young often remain in their parent's territory until the following year.
  Blue Jay   Eurasian Magpie
 
Blue Jay, Cyanocitta cristata.
Clemson
                                                  SI Web
 
Eurasian Magpie, Pica pica.
Temple of Olympian Zeus, Athens, Greece. Photo by  Ed Konrad
                                      Wiki     EoL
 
  Family Cnemophilidae - Satinbirds, Cnemophilines
Wiki    EoL
  3 species, 2 genera (Cnemophilus, Loboparadisea). New Guinea. Traditionally placed with the birds of paradise but may actually be more closely related to the Melanocharitidae (Berryoeckers).
   They have a wide gape and a short, stout bill. They lack the elaborate plumes of the Birds of Paradise. Males are brighter than females. They are relatively small birds. All species are sexually dimorphic. They have weak feet, side gapes and an unossified nasal region. They forage at all levels of montane forests and secondary growth. They eat fruits and berries and small invertebrates.
   All are polygynous. Some have elaborate displays and may defend display areas. They all build domed nests in vegetation or on a rock face.  Females lay a single egg which she incubates for about 26 days. Parental care is by the female.
 
  Family Paradisaeidae – Birds-of-Paradise, Melampitta
Wiki    EoL
  45 (44, 40) species, 17 (16) genera. Found in Indonesia and New Guinea, with a few in coastal eastern Australia. They inhabit a variety of forested habitats and may be restricted to particular altitudinal zones.
   Sibley and Monroe (1990) and Clements (2007) include the Greater and Lesser Melampitta (Melampitta) in this group. Dickinson (2003) places it as a genus incertae sedis between the Australian mudnesters and birds-of-paradise.
   The Paradise-Crow (Lycocorax pyrrhopterus), members of the genus Paradigalla, and the manucodes are monogamous and monomorphic. Manucodes have a long, looped trachea that is particularly well developed in males. Others birds-of-paradise are sexually dimorphic and males are larger than females. A second group of species has dispersed display arenas in which males use loud calls to advertise and attract females. In a third group of lekking species, males are large and have brightly colored plumage with variously modified feathers used in display. They have elaborate displays and dances. Most birds-of- paradise are polygynous and females care for the young. Some build their nests on branches, others prefer dense vines. The nest is a shallow cup or a suspended basket. One species is a hole nester. Most lay 1-2 eggs, incubation takes 14-26 days (18-19 average). Young are fed by the female (both parents in monogamous species) and they fledge after 16-30 days.
   Most species mature in 2 years but the males in some take up to 5 years to reach sexual maturity. Hybridization is frequent among polygynous species suggesting close relationships among species.
   Most species are relatively sedentary but manucodes are semi-nomadic, roaming the forest searching for figs (and keeping in contact with their loud, resonant calls). Most feed on a variety of fruit and invertebrates and may eat seeds, nectar, and small vertebrates. Riflebirds and sickle-bills are largely insectivorous and scansorial - feeding like northern treecreepers. 
   
   
   
   
   
 

 

 

 

 

 

   
    Banner - Clark's Nutcracker.