Birds of the World

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ANECDOTES

  Galapagos Mockingbirds
 
 
 

TRAITS
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Totipalmate Swm

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Waders
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 NW Vultures
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Pici
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PASSERINES
   NZ WRENS
   OW SUBOSC

      Broadbills
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 NW SUBOSC
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 OSCINES
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 9-prim. Oscines

   Fringillines
   Carduelines
   Hawaiian Honycrp
   NW Sparrows
   NW Warblers
   Tanagers
   Cardinals
   NW Blackbirds

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Passeriformes, Oscines, Passerida, Muscicapoidea - Mockingbirds
 
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Passerida, Muscicapoidea
Family: Philippine Creepers, Starlings, Mimids
 
Species:   
Galapagos Mockingbird, Charles Mockingbird, Hood Mockingbird, Chathan Mockingbird
 
Skip to:   
Darwin and Mockingbirds
 
Images:   
European Starling, Common Mnnah, Gray Catbird, Northern Mockingbird, Brown Thrasher
 
  Galapagos Mockingbird, Nesomimus parvulus
 
Wiki
     Galapagos Mockingbirds nest in trees or cacti, generally during the rainy season (December - April). They lay 3-4 eggs which are incubated about two weeks. Young fledge in 17 days but remain with their parents for 5-6 weeks and may help with the second brood. The family may remain together as a family after the breeding season and young may help with subsequent boods.
   There are six subspecies:
      N. p. barringtoni - Santa Fe
      N. p. bauri - Genovesa
      N. p. hulli - Darwin
      N. p. parvulus - Santa Cruz, Seymour, Daphne, Isabela, Fernandina
      N. p. personatus - Pinta, Marchena, Santiago, Radida
      N. p. wenmani - Wolf
  Galapagos Mockingbird Galapagos Mockingbird Galapagos Mockingbird
  Puerto Egas, San Salvador (Santiago). Young bird gathering nest material. A helper. Los Gemelos, Santa Cruz.

Urbina Bay, Isabela
(above and below).

     
Galapagos Mockingbird
 
  Charles (Floreana) Mockingbird, Nesomimus trifasciatus
 
Wiki
  Charles Mockingbird Charles Mockingbird    The Charles Mockingbird was previously found on Floreana (Charles) but has become extinct on the larger island (cats, rats). It is now found only on the small islands of Champion and Gardner off the coast. The total population is probably <100.
 
Charles Mockingbird
Charles Mockingbird




  Champion
   Island
 
     
  Hood (Española) Mockingbird, Nesomimus macdonaldi 
 
  Wiki
     The Hood Mockingbird is slightly larger than the other mockingbirds and they have longer legs. The bill is also more down-curved. The eyes are hazel. Outside the breeding season, they form flocks of up to 40 individuals who may greet tourists and try to get at their water bottles. Restricted to Española (Hood) and the small neighboring Gardner Island. Hood Mockingbird (Left) Investigating a towel on Gardner Island beach.

Other individuals on Española
  Hood Mockingbird Hood Mockingbird Hood Mockingbird
     
  Chatham (San Cristobal) Mockingbird, Nesomimus melanotis     
 
Wiki
     The Chatham Mockingbird is similar to the other species. Its eyes are greenish-yellow. It is restricted to San Cristobal (which we did not visit).
   
     
 
 
Darwin and Mockingbirds
   Charles Darwin had access to specimens of all four species of mockingbirds found in the Galapagos and recognized them as related (descended from a common ancestor) but different (separate species). Although much credit is given to the assemblage of 13 Geospizine finches found in the islands for Darwin's insights into natural selection and the origin of species, he did not correctly classify these birds as of related descent - their adaptations were too diverse and it required the later work of John Gould and other colleagues to correctly interpret the finches. However, the mockingbirds presented a simple, clear, and compelling case for natural selection and evolution.
       
    Banner - Hood Mockingbird., Española (Hood). Galapagos.