Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

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Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

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Resources
 
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  Field Guides
General References
South Carolina Birds
Text Books on Ornithology
HOME STUDY
The Origin and Evolution of Birds
Speciation and Biogeography
Birds of the World - General References
Taxonomic References - Technical
Software and the Web
Videos
Optics
Cameras
 
 

Field Guides / Identification

 

Sibley, D. A. 2014. The Sibley Guide to Birds.2nd ed. Alfred A. Knopf, New York
   This is really a home reference. The following book contains many of these illustrations and can be carried in a pocket...

Sibley, D. A. 2003. The Sibley Field Guide to Birds of Eastern North America. Alfred A. Knopf, New York      
    There is a companion guide for western North America if you travel...

   I'd recommend owning one or both of these first two books - Sibley has the best coverage of  plumages. If you have the first edition (2010), buy
   the second - it adds many more images to the guidde.

   Any of the following would be good back up (get the latest edition)...

Dunn, J. L, J. Alderfer. 2006. National Geographic Field Guide to the Birds of North America 5th ed. Random House.

Robbins, C. S., H. S. Zim, B. Bruun, A. B. Singer. 2001. Birds of North America. Rev. ed. St. Martin's Press.

Peterson, R. T. 2008. Peterson  Field Guide to the Birds North America. Houghton Mifflin, Harcourt. Boston
   (This is the field guide that really started modern "bird-watching" in the US. It was first published in 1934 and inaugurated the use of a pointer
   to highlight crucial field marks. The latest edition covers all of North America and is a larger format. The following is the smaller guide.)


Peterson, R. T., V. M. Peterson. 2002. A Field Guide to the Birds of Eastern and Central North America. Houghton Mifflin, Harcourt. Boston.
   My preference is for field guides that use paintings (above) rather than photographs (Kaufman, National Audubon Society, etc.) but there are
   many field guides available, all  with useful information.

Crossley, R. 2011. The Crossley ID Guide. Crossley Books, Princeton University Press. Princeton
   In this unique book, the author uses photographs (mostly his) placed against an approprite habitat background.

Kaufman, Kenn. 2011. Kaufman Field Guide to Advanced Birding. Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. Boston, New York.
  Use this reference for difficult species groups - scoters, dowitchers, Empidonax flycatchers, etc.

   If you plan to travel to Europe, you should have this guide:

Svensson, L., P. J. Grant, K. Mullarney, and D. Zetterström. 1999. Birds of Europe.
  
Princeton University Press, Princeton.

   For shorebirds - wonderful photos:

O'Brien, M., R. Crossley, and K. Karlson. 2006. The Shorebird Guide. Houghton
   Mifflin Company. Boston and New York.

 
 

General References to North American Birds

  Alderfer, J. (ed.). 2006. National Geographic Compete Birds of North America. NGS, Washington, DC.

Alsop, F. J. III. 2001. Birds of North America. Eastern Region. DK Publishing.

Alsop, F. J. III. 2001. Birds of North America. Western Region. DK Publishing.

Kaufman, K. 1996. Lives of North American Birds. Houghton Mifflin Co., Boston/New York.
 
 

South Carolina Birds

  Post, W. and S. A. Gauthreaux, Jr. 1989. Status and Distribution of South Carolina Birds. Contributions Charleston Museum XVIII, Charleston.

McNair, D. B. and W. Post. 1993. Supplement to Status and Distribution of South Carolina Birds. Charleston Museum Ornithological
    Contribution No. 8, Charleston.
    (These two contributions from the Charleston Museum track the published record of species found in South Carolina based on a valid
    museum speciment, a recognizable photography or sound recording, or at least four independent sight records supported by a published
    account or records on file in a public institution until 1993. For a continuing summary see Avendex software by Redshank Software cited
    below.)


Potter, E. F., J. F. Parnell, R. P. Teulings, R. Davis. 2006. Birds of the Carolinas. 2nd ed. Univ. North Carolina Press, Chapel Hill.
    If you have the older edition, upgrade to the new one - there is a lot of newer information available.


Sprunt, A., Jr. and E. B. Chamberlain. 1970. South Carolina Bird Life. Rev. Ed. Univ. South Carolina Press, Columbia. [Originally published 1949.]
   (Available used from Barnes & Noble and other book sellers.)

Carter, Robin M. 1993. Finding Birds in South Carolina. Univ. South Carolina Press, Columbia.
   (This book is out of print but you really need it for its descriptions of South Carolina birding areas - several used copies are currently listed on
    Amazon.com or through Barnes & Nobel.)


  The following book is a partial replacement for this reference:

Mollenhauer, Jeff. 2009. Birding South Carolina. FalconGuides, Guilford CT.

National Audubon Society, Christmas Bird Counts (CBC).
   Click on Historical Results to view data for different years and locations.

South Carolina Breeding Bird Atlas (SCBBA), South Carolina Department of Natural Resources. 1988-1998.
       
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