Birds of Seabrook Island

COAST BIRDS
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WORLD BIRDS
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ANECDOTES

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Species Acct.
Loons
Grebes
Procellarids
Pelicans
Herons
Ibises
Storks
Vultures
Flamingos
Waterfowl
Raptors
Turkeys
Quail
Rails
Limpkin
Cranes
Shorebirds
Gulls
Terns
Auks
Doves
Parrots
Cuckoos
Owls
Goatsuckers
Swifts
Hummers
Kingfishers
Woodpckrs
Flycatchers
Shrikes
Vireos
Crows/Jays
Larks
Swallows
Tits
Nuthatches
Creepers
Wrens
Kinglets
Gnatcatchers
Thrushes
Mimids
Starlings
Pipits
Waxwings
NW Warblers
Tanagers
NWSparrows
Cardinalines
Icterids
Finches
OWSparrows

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Resources
 
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  Field Guides
General References
South Carolina Birds
Text Books on Ornithology
HOME STUDY
The Origin and Evolution of Birds
Speciation and Biogeography
Birds of the World - General References
Taxonomic References - Technical
Software and the Web
Videos
Optics
Cameras
 
 

Text Books on Ornithology

  Gill, F. B. 2006. Ornithology. 3rd ed. Freeman, New York.

Podulka, S., R. W. Rohrbaugh, Jr., R. Bonney. eds. 2004, Handbook of Bird Biology. 2nd ed. Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Ithaca, and Princeton
   University Press.

van Tyne, J. and A. J. Berger. 1976. Fundamentals of Ornithology. 2nd ed. John Wiley & Sons, New York.
   (Available used - contains description of bird families.)


Welty, J. C. and L. Baptista. 1997. The Life of Birds. 4th ed. Saunders, New York

 
 

HOME STUDY

  The Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology offers a Home Study Course using Podulka et al. as a text book. This is a self-paced, distance-learning course at the college level. After completing 10 exams, individuals receive a certificate (and have learned a lot of avian biology). To sign up, go to www.birds.cornell.edu/homestudy.
 
 

The Origin and Evolution of Birds

  Feduccia, A. 1999. The Origin and Evolution of Birds. 2nd ed. Yale, New Haven & London
   (Alan reviews the evolution of birds arguing that their origin predates the evolution of dinosaurs so our view of birds as "feathered dinosaurs"
   is not strictly correct. This book needs updating in light of many new discoveries of feathered reptiles in China in recent years but it gives a very
   comprehensive picture of avian origins.)


Chiappe, L. 2007. Glorified Dinosaurs: Origin and Early Evolution of Birds John Wiley and Sons. New York.
   (This reference includes many new fossils that help to explain the relationships of birds to dinosaurs, the origins of feathers and flight, and
   diversification of modern birds from Chiappe's point-of-view.)


Feduccia, A. L. D. Martin, and S. Tarsitano. 2007. Archaeopteryx 2007; Quo Vadis? Auk 124 (2): 373-380.
    These authors suggest that the Chinese fossils with true avian feathers should be interpreted as secondarily flightless birds or offshoots
    of the early avian radiation at all stages of flight and flightlessness. They define the clade Aves by feathers, an avian hand with digits
    2-3-4, and a reversed hallux. The challenge remains to distinguish aves from early theropods with similar structures. They suggest that
   Archaeopteryx remains the classic "urvogel."
 
 

Speciation and Biogeography

  Newton, I. 2003. The Speciation and Biogeography of Birds. Academic Press, Amsterdam.
   
 
 

Birds of the World - General References

    Austin, O, L., Jr., A. Singer (illustrations), and H. T. Zim (editor). 1961. Birds of the World. Golden Press, New York.
   (Excellent art showing representatives of bird families.)

Beletsky, L. 2006. Birds of the World.. Johns Hopkins University Press. Baltimore.
   (An introduction to the diversity of birds with descriptions of the major biological features of each group and small but excellent illustrations
    of selected species.)


Burnie, D., B. Hoare, and Audubon. 2007. Bird. The Definitive Visual Guide. DK Publishing, New York.
   (Excellent photos of many of the birds of the world. Some mistakes in information.)

Fisher, J. and R. T. Peterson (illustrations). 1998. The World of Birds. Rev Ed. Purnell & Sons, Paulton and London.
   (Introduction to birds with maps showing the distribution of each family. Earlier editions available from used book sellers.)

Forshaw, J. M. 2006. Parrots of the World. Princeton University Press, Princeton and Oxford.

del Hoyo, J. (and others). 1992 - 2008. Handbook of Birds of the World. 16 volumes. Lynx Edicions.
   (Set through Vol. 13 available for $2,730, 14-16 in prep.) See http://www.hbw.com/

Harris, T. (ed). 2009. Complete Birds of the World. National Geographic. Washington.

Payne, R. B. Recent Families, Birds of the World. Course materials used at the University of Michigan.
   See http://www.ummz.umich.edu/birds/resources/families_otw.html

Peters, J. L.  Check-List of Birds of the World. 16 volumes, 1931 -1987.
   James L. Peters, first an Associate and then Curator of Birds at the Museum of Comparative Zoology at Harvard University, began an attempt to reconcile obsolete lists of current taxonomy available in the 1920s. He published Vol. 1 of this series in 1931 (this volume was revised by E. Mayr and G. W. Cottrell in 1979 - the only volume up-dated from the original). Six subsequent volumes appeared at roughly three-year intervals. In the late 1040s, John T. Zimmer was asked to prepare material on the Tyrannidae, most of Vol. VIII. Peters died in 1952 while working on Vol. IX. In 1953, James C. Greenway, Jr. became Curator (and Ernst Mayr joined Harvard as Alexander Agassiz  Professor of Zoology). They solicited a number of authors to prepare portions of the work and obtained NSF funding to help finance the remaining volumes. It should be noted that the Check-List expanded from one author's meticulous compilations into an international effort - eventually 33 ornithologists became involved. Following Greenway's departure from the MCZ, Raymond Paynter became Curator and continued as editor through the completion of the project with the index volume, Vol XVI, in 1987.
   Note that The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World, has followed the Peter's Check-List and maintains a reference to materials in the 16 volumes. An Index to Families and Subfamilies was published with Vol. XVI and is available here in .pdf format.


Robertson, D. 2008. Bird Families of the World. A running attempt to keep up with
changes in classification.
  
See http://montereybay.com/creagrus/list.html

Mindel, D. P. and J. W. Brown. 2005. Neornithes. Modern Birds. 14 December 2005 (under construction).
   http://www.tolweb.org/Neornithes in Tree of Life Web Project.
   With hierarchical links to all extant birds...

   
   

Taxonomic References - Technical

    Committee on Classification and Nomenclature. 1998. North American Birds. 7th ed. American Ornithologists' Union, Washington, DC
    (This is the latest edition but supplements are available.) Visit the AOU Website...
    To view the complete, up-to-date checklist, go to the following URL: http://www.aou.org/checklist/north/results.php

Clements, J. F. 2007. The Clements Checklist of Birds of the World.  6th. ed. Comstock Publishing Assoc., Cornell University Press. Ithaca.    This edition of the checklist is now the official world checklist of the American Birding Association. Each species (with subspecies where    appropriate) is given along with an abbreviated range. The current ABA Checklist is available at http://www.aba.org/checklist/

Dickinson, E. C. (ed.) 2003. The Howard and Moore Complete Checklist of the Birds of the World. 3rd ed. Princeton University Press,
    Princeton and Oxford.
   Joel Cracraft, F. Keith Barker, and Alice Cibois discuss higher level phylogenies in light of advances since Sibley and Ahlquist, 1990.
   See p. 16-21. This compendium lists 9,721 species in 2,161 genera


Sibley, C. G. 2955, A Synopsis of the Birds of the World. Dept. of Conservation, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.
   A mimeographed manual of systematic ornithology Sibley used while teaching at Cornell.

Sibley, C. G. and J. E. Ahlquist. 1990. Phylogeny and Classification of Birds. Yale University Press, New Haven & London  
    (This is the first comprehensive attempt to use molecular techniques (DNA hybridization) along with other classic characteristics to derive a
    complete phylogeny of birds. Much of the information is beyond what you probably need to know but it is a comprehensive reference for
    modern classification. (Charles Sibley is David Allen Sibley's father so birds can really run in the family.)


Sibley, C. G. and B. L. Monroe, Jr. 1990. Distribution and Taxonomy of Birds of the World. Yale University Press, New Haven & London.
   (This compendium lists 9,672 species of  birds recognized by Sibley and Ahlquist in 1990 and gives their distribution.)
       
    Banner - The Biological Laboratories. Harvard University, Cambridge, MS.